Tag Archives: conductive AFM probes

Conductive Polymer-Ag Honeycomb Thin Film: The Factors Affecting the Complexity of the Microstructure

“Fast growth in Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted a lot of attention of flexible and easily processable hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials, integrated into modern electronics and applied in multidisciplinary fields. Nanoporous and microporous thin films with regularly ordered pores exemplified by honeycomb films have received considerable interest due to its diverse potential applications, such as optoelectronics, microstructured electrodes, sensors, and charge storage devices, synthetic templates for nanoparticles, catalytic supports with large surface areas, scaffold materials in biotechnology and separation. Various materials have been applied for the synthesis of the honeycomb structures, such as star polymers, hyperbranched polymers, surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalate for polystyrene, cross-linkable monomers,and biological molecules.”*

In the article cited here Sajjad Husain Mir and Bungo Ochiai have investigated the factors affecting the micro-structuration of the polymer-Ag honeycomb films and investigated the I-V characteristics. The pore sizes of the polymer-Ag honeycomb films were feasibly tuned by altering various parameters, namely, casting volume, polymer concentration, and molecular weight of the grafted poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) chain.*

The current-sensing scanning probe microscopy (CSSPM) images for this article were taken using a NANOSENSORS™ Platinum-Silicide AFM probe. ( PtSi-CONT ).

Figure 6 from Mir & Ochiai "Conductive Polymer-Ag Honeycomb Thin Film: The Factors Affecting the Complexity of the Microstructure* a) Topography SPM image, and b)I-V curves of the polymer-Ag honeycomb film on HOPG (preparation conditions for polymer-Ag honeycomb film: poly(NVK-co-MAH)-g-PMMA from PMMA (Mn=2100), 0.3 mg mL−1 and 50μL; measurement conditions: topography SPM image was taken by contact mode using microfabricated PtSi- coated cantilever (f0: 15 kHz, C: 0.2 N m−1), and the I-V curves were taken at specific points. NANOSENSORS PtSi-CONT AFM probes were used for the Current-sensing scanning probe microscopy (CSSPM) images
Figure 6 from Mir & Ochiai “Conductive Polymer-Ag Honeycomb Thin Film: The Factors
Affecting the Complexity of the Microstructure*
a) Topography SPM image, and b) I-V curves of the polymer-Ag honeycomb film on HOPG (preparation conditions for polymer-Ag honeycomb film: poly(NVK-co-MAH)-g-PMMA from PMMA (Mn=2100), 0.3 mg mL−1 and 50μL; measurement conditions: topography SPM image was taken by contact mode using microfabricated PtSi-coated cantilever (f0: 15 kHz, C: 0.2 N m−1), and the I-V curves were taken at specific points.

*Sajjad Husain Mir,  Bungo Ochiai
Conductive Polymer-Ag Honeycomb Thin Film: The Factors Affecting the Complexity of the Microstructure
Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 165 (8) B3030-B3034 (2018)
JES Focus issue on ubiquitous sensors and systems for IOT
DOI: 10.1149/2.0031808jes

Open Access The article “Conductive Polymer-Ag Honeycomb Thin Film: The Factors Affecting the Complexity of the Microstructure” by Sajjad Husain Mir and Bungo Ochiai is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films

A NANOSENSORS AdvancedTEC ATEC-EFM PtIr coated AFM probe was used for the piezo force microscopy (PFM) characterization in this interesting paper by Borderon et.al Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films published in Nature Communications.

Figure 1 from Borderon et al. Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films: Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM) characterization of the epitaxial PZT thin films. The scan size is 2 μm×1 μm for the c-domain ample and 1 μm × 0.5 μm for the a/c-domain sample. PFM characterization done with ATEC-EFM AFM probe
Figure 1 from Borderon et.al Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films: Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM) characterization of the epitaxial PZT thin films. The scan size is 2 μm×1
μm for the c-domain ample and 1 μm × 0.5 μm for the a/c-domain sample.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. Borderon, A. E. Brunier, K. Nadaud, R. Renoud, M. Alexe, H. W. Gundel
Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films
Nature Scientific Reports, volume 7, Article number: 3444 (2017)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03757-y

To read the full article please follow this external link: https://rdcu.be/5qTo

Open Access:  The article  Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films  by Borderon et.al is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing,  adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

 


		
	

Long-range Stripe Nanodomains in Epitaxial (110) BiFeO 3 Thin Films on (100) NdGaO 3 Substrate

NANOSENSORS PtIr coated PPP-EFM AFM tips were used for the PFM imaging in this interesting paper.

Figure 2: AFM topography images of; (a) 130 nm BFO film grown on NGO and (b) on 100 nm LSCO layered NGO. (c,d) Section analysis along the lines drawn in (c) and (d), respectively, showing the puckering of the surfaces. from: Long-range Stripe Nanodomains in Epitaxial (110) BiFeO3 Thin Films on (100) NdGaO3 Substrate
Figure 2: AFM topography images of; (a) 130 nm BFO film grown on NGO and (b) on 100 nm LSCO layered NGO. (c,d) Section analysis along the lines drawn in (c) and (d), respectively, showing the puckering of the surfaces.
from: Long-range Stripe Nanodomains in Epitaxial (110) BiFeO3 Thin Films on (100) NdGaO3 Substrate

Yogesh Sharma, Radhe Agarwal, Charudatta Phatak, Bumsoo Kim, Seokwoo Jeon, Ram S. Katiyar & Seungbum Hong Long-range Stripe Nanodomains in Epitaxial (110) BiFeO3 Thin Films on (100) NdGaO3 Substrate,
Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 4857 (2017), doi:10.1038/s41598-017-05055-z

Abstract: Here, we report the observation of ferroelectric and ferroelastic nanodomains in (110)-oriented BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films epitaxially grown on low symmetric (100) NdGaO3 (NGO) substrate. We observed long range ordering of ferroelectric 109° stripe nanodomains separated by periodic vertical domain walls in as-grown 130 nm thick BFO films. The effect of La 0.67 Sr0.33 CoO3 (LSCO) conducting interlayer on domain configurations in BFO/NGO film was also observed with relatively short range-ordering of stripe domains due to the modified electrostatic boundary conditions in BFO/LSCO/NGO film. Additional studies on B-site doping of Nb ions in BFO films showed change in the domain structures due to doping induced change in lattice anisotropy while maintaining the stripe domain morphology with 109° domain wall. This long-range array of ferroelectric and ferroelastic domains can be useful for optoelectronic devices and ferroelastic templates for strain coupled artificial magnetoelectric heterostructures.

For the full article please follow this external link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05055-z.epdf

Creative CommonsThe article “Long-range Stripe Nanodomains in Epitaxial (110) BiFeO 3 Thin Films on (100) NdGaO 3 Substrate” by Yogesh Sharma et. al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/