NANOSENSORS introduces MSS-8RM – a readout module for membrane-type surface stress sensors (MSS)

The NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensor (MSS) is a device to detect specific components in gaseous phase with high sensitivity using a piezoresisitive nanomechanical sensor. This device shows great potential as a core component for electronic-nose (olfactory) systems utilized in e.g., medical, food, environment, safety and security fields.
Now NANOSENSORS™ introduces the MSS 8 Channel Readout Module (MSS-8RM), a basic electronic module to operate and to readout NANOSENSORS™ MSS, up to 8 sensors simultaneously, under a hardware configuration for electronic-nose sensing. MSS-8RM contains two air pumps and users can examine “self-prepared” MSS (compatible: SD-MSS-1K and SD-MSS-1K2G) under different gas flow conditions.

NANOSENSORS MSS-8RM - 8 Channel Readout Module for MSS Membrane-type Surface-stress Sensor
NANOSENSORS MSS-8RM – 8 Channel Readout Module for MSS

MSS-8RM is designed as simply as possible so that users can learn about a basic electronic-nose system and further improve the system performance. MSS-8RM does not include any data processing functions to distinguish one sample from the other. Users will obtain raw numerical data of the sensor responses under different conditions as final output.

inside NANOSENSORS MSS-8RM - sensor board for maximum 8 Membrane-type Surface Stress Sensor (MSS)
inside NANOSENSORS MSS-8RM – sensor board

NANOSENSORS™ has added MSS-8RM – MSS 8 Channel Readout Module (order code: SD-MSS-8RM ) – to its Special Development list (http://www.nanosensors.com/pdf/SpecialDevelopmentsList.pdf).
For further technical information, price or delivery times please contact us at info@nanosensors.com

Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite

NANOSENSORS PPP-EFM AFM tips were used in the research for this article. Have a look at the abstract or follow the external link to the full article.

Figure 1: Crystal structure and domains in boracites. From: Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite
Figure 1: Crystal structure and domains in boracites.
From: Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite

Raymond G.P. McQuaid, Michael P. Campbell, Roger W. Whatmore, Amit Kumar, J. Marty Gregg
Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite. Nat. Commun. 8, 15105 doi: 10.1038/ncomms15105 (2017).

Abstract:
Ferroelectric domain walls constitute a completely new class of sheet-like functional material. Moreover, since domain walls are generally writable, erasable and mobile, they could be useful in functionally agile devices: for example, creating and moving conducting walls could make or break electrical connections in new forms of reconfigurable nanocircuitry. However, significant challenges exist: site-specific injection and annihilation of planar walls, which show robust conductivity, has not been easy to achieve. Here, we report the observation, mechanical writing and controlled movement of charged conducting domain walls in the improper-ferroelectric Cu3B7O13Cl. Walls are straight, tens of microns long and exist as a consequence of elastic compatibility conditions between specific domain pairs. We show that site-specific injection of conducting walls of up to hundreds of microns in length can be achieved through locally applied point-stress and, once created, that they can be moved and repositioned using applied electric fields.

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15105

Creative Commons BYThe article “Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite” by McQuaid, R. G. P. et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

New Method for Torque Magnetometry Using a Commercially Available Membrane-Type Surface Stress Sensor

In this article the authors present a  new method for torque magnetometry by using a commercially available membrane-type surface stress sensor (MSS) – the NANOSENSORS MSS. This sensor has a silicon membrane supported by four beams in which piezoresistive paths are integrated. Although originally developed as a gas sensor, it can be used for torque measurement by modifying its on-chip aluminum interconnections. The authors demonstrate the magnetic-torque measurement of submillimeter-sized crystals at low temperature and in strong magnetic fields. This MSS can observe de-Haas–van-Alphen oscillation, which confirms that it can be an alternative tool for self-sensitive microcantilevers.

NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface Stress Sensors MSS
NANOSENSORS Membrane-type Surface Stress Sensors MSS

Hideyuki Takahashi, Kento Ishimura, Tsubasa Okamoto, Eiji Ohmichi and Hitoshi Ohta
New Method for Torque Magnetometry Using a Commercially Available Membrane-Type Surface Stress Sensor
J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 86, 063002 (2017)
http://dx.doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.86.063002

Please follow this external link for the full article: http://journals.jps.jp/doi/10.7566/JPSJ.86.063002