Tag Archives: AFM Tips

Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability

Muscle wasting is connected with changes in various cellular mechanisms that influence protein homeostasis, transcription, protein acetylation and different metabolic pathways. *

Scientific studies have shown that reduced levels of polyadenylation binding protein 1 ( PABPN1 , a multifactorial regulator of mRNA processing ) cause muscle wasting, including muscle atrophy, extracellular matrix thickening, myofiber typing transitions and central nucleation. *

However, the cellular mechanisms behind PABPN1-mediated muscle wasting are not fully understood. *

In the article “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler and Vered Raz examine the cytoskeletal auxiliary changes that are dependent on PABPN1 levels using 2D and 3D models, and investigate how these affect muscle wasting. *

They suggest that poor cytoskeletal mechanical features are caused by altered expression levels of cytoskeletal proteins and contribute to muscle wasting and atrophy. *

For the measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells ( muscle cells with reduced PABPN1 levels ) the authors used Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. *

NANOSENSORS™ uniqprobe qp-BioAC ( CB3 ) AFM probes were used in the quantitative imaging where a force curve is applied at each point. The analyzed area of each cell was 5 µm × 5 µm (64 × 64 pixels) with an approach speed of 35 µm/s (3.4 ms/pixel), and applied forces of up to 118 pN. *

Figure 4 from “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie et al.
 Disrupted cytoskeletal spatial organization in shPAB human muscle cell cultures. A Representative images of control and shPAB human muscle cell cultures, stained with antibodies to tubulin and actin, and the actin filaments were visualized with actin-GFP. B Tubulin staining in control and shPAB myoblast cell cultures after DMSO, 100 nM nocodazole or 25 nM paclitaxel treatment for 2 h. Scale bar is 25 µm. C Measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells using the Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy (Ci) or the Atomic Force Microscopy (Cii). Measurements were carried out in myoblasts; every dot represents the median from 1000 measurements in a cell. Cell stiffness is measured by GHz, and the young modulus reports the cell surface tension. Averages and standard deviations are from N = 15 cells. Statistical significance was calculated with the student’s t-test.
NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC ( CB3 ) AFM probes were used in the quantitative imaging of cell-mechanics properties.
Figure 4 from “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie et al.
 Disrupted cytoskeletal spatial organization in shPAB human muscle cell cultures. A Representative images of control and shPAB human muscle cell cultures, stained with antibodies to tubulin and actin, and the actin filaments were visualized with actin-GFP. B Tubulin staining in control and shPAB myoblast cell cultures after DMSO, 100 nM nocodazole or 25 nM paclitaxel treatment for 2 h. Scale bar is 25 µm. C Measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells using the Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy (Ci) or the Atomic Force Microscopy (Cii). Measurements were carried out in myoblasts; every dot represents the median from 1000 measurements in a cell. Cell stiffness is measured by GHz, and the young modulus reports the cell surface tension. Averages and standard deviations are from N = 15 cells. Statistical significance was calculated with the student’s t-test.

*Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler & Vered Raz
Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability
Nature Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 17621 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74676-8

Please follow this external link to read the full article https://rdcu.be/ceyJ4

Open Access: The article “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler & Vered Raz is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

In‐situ force measurement during nano‐indentation combined with Laue microdiffraction

A NANOSENSORS™ self-sensing self-activating Akiyama probe was used in a home-built Scanning Probe Microscope for this interesting research article.

*Florian Lauraux, Sarah Yehya, Stéphane Labat, Jean‐Sébastien Micha, Odile Robach, Oleg Kovalenko, Eugen Rabkin, Olivier Thomas, Thomas W. Cornelius
In‐situ force measurement during nano‐indentation combined with Laue microdiffraction
Nano Select , Volume2, Issue1, January 2021, Pages 99-106
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/nano.202000073

NANOSENSORS self-sensing and self-actuating Akiyama-probe AFM probe
NANOSENSORS self-sensing and self-actuating Akiyama-probe

Please have a look at the abstract below or follow the external link above to read the full article.

Abstract:

“For the characterization of the mechanical properties of materials the precise measurements of stress‐strain curves is indispensable. In situ nano‐mechanical testing setups, however, may lack the precision either in terms of strain or stress determination. Recently, the custom‐built scanning force microscope SFINX was developed which is compatible with third‐generation synchrotron end‐stations allowing for in situ nano‐mechanical tests in combination with nanofocused synchrotron x‐ray diffraction that is highly sensitive to strain and defects. The usage of a self‐actuating and self‐sensing cantilever tremendously increases the compactness of the system but lacks deflection sensitivity and, thus the force measurement. This deficiency is resolved by in situ monitoring the diffraction peaks of the Si cantilever by Laue microdiffraction during the nano‐indentation of a gold crystal. The orientation and, hence, the deflection of the Si cantilever is deduced from the displacement of the Si Laue spots on the detector giving force accuracies of better than 90 nN. At the same time, the dislocation density in the indented Au crystal is tracked by monitoring the Au Laue spots eventually resulting in complete stress‐dislocation density curves.”*

Open Access: The article “In‐situ force measurement during nano‐indentation combined with Laue microdiffraction” by Florian Lauraux, Sarah Yehya, Stéphane Labat, Jean‐Sébastien Micha, Odile Robach, Oleg Kovalenko, Eugen Rabkin, Olivier Thomas, Thomas W. Cornelius is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.