Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet

Graphene, since its discovery in 2004 has attracted enormous interest due to its physical and chemical properties, and wide applications. *

Graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as an attractive alternative to graphene due to low cost, large scale production and solution processability. GO is prepared by oxidative exfoliation of graphite.*

The work function is a fundamental electronic property of a material and can be used to interpret the relative position of the Fermi level.*

For efficient transport of electrons or holes in a heterojunction device, the work function of the materials plays a crucial role, since work function determines how the bands will align at the contacts.*

Recently there has been an increased interest in applications of GO for interfacial layers and transparent electrode materials in optoelectronic devices e.g. liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), touch screens, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and as supercapacitor electrodes. Tuning the work function of GO is key to achieving high performance devices. *

In the article “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy, the authors demonstrate doping graphene oxide (GO) films using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with subsequent tuning of the work function.*

The surface potential of the plasma functionalized GO films could be tuned by 120 ± 10 mV by varying plasma parameters. *

Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy ( SKPM ) also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy ( KPFM ) measurements were carried out to realize changes in work function of the GO films with plasma functionalization.*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-EFM AFM probes with a platinum iridium coating were used to perform surface potential measurements. *

The Kelvin probe studies showed that the bonding configuration can influence the work function of GO. Pyridinic nitrogen transforms GO to p-type while graphitic nitrogen increases the electron density of GO and transforming it to n type. Pointing to the fact that a low power APPJ can effectively tune the work function of GO and hence the conductivity. *

The findings presented in the article are extremely useful in fabricating heterojunction devices like sensors and optoelectronic devices where band structure alignment is key to device performance when GO is used as a charge transport layer. This technique can be extended to other known 2D systems.*

Fig. 10 (a) from “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey et al.:

a) KPFM surface potential map of reference GO thin film ( please have a look at https://pubs.rsc.org/image/article/2020/CP/c9cp06174f/c9cp06174f-f10_hi-res.gif for the full figure.)
Figure 10 (a) from “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey et al.:

a) KPFM surface potential map of reference GO thin film ( please have a look at https://pubs.rsc.org/image/article/2020/CP/c9cp06174f/c9cp06174f-f10_hi-res.gif for the full figure.)

*Avishek Dey, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy
Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 2020, 22, 7685-7698
DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06174F

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2020/cp/c9cp06174f

Open Access: The article “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey, logoa, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields

A gel consists of a network of particles or molecules formed for example using the sol-gel process, by which a solution transforms into a porous solid. Particles or molecules in a gel are mainly organized on a scaffold that makes up a porous system. Quantized vortices in type-II superconductors mostly form spatially homogeneous ordered or amorphous solids.*

In the article “Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields” José Benito Llorens, Lior Embon, Alexandre Correa, Jesús David González, Edwin Herrera, Isabel Guillamón, Roberto F. Luccas, Jon Azpeitia, Federico J. Mompeán, Mar García-Hernández, Carmen Munuera, Jazmín Aragón Sánchez, Yanina Fasano, Milorad V. Milošević, Hermann Suderow and Yonathan Anahory present high-resolution imaging of the vortex lattice displaying dense vortex clusters separated by sparse or entirely vortex-free regions in β−Bi2Pd superconductor.*

The authors find that the intervortex distance diverges upon decreasing the magnetic field and that vortex lattice images follow a multifractal behavior. These properties, characteristic of gels, establish the presence of a novel vortex distribution, distinctly different from the well-studied disordered and glassy phases observed in high-temperature and conventional superconductors.*

The observed behavior is caused by a scaffold of one-dimensional structural defects with enhanced stress close to the defects. The vortex gel might often occur in type-II superconductors at low magnetic fields. Such vortex distributions should allow to considerably simplify control over vortex positions and manipulation of quantum vortex states.*

The results presented in the article show that vortices are nearly independent to each other at very low magnetic fields and that their position is locked to the defect structure in the sample. This suggests that vortices in this field range are also highly manipulable, much more than in usual hexagonal or disordered vortex lattices.

The magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements described in the article were performed in a commercial Low-Temperature  SPM equipment working in the 300–1.8  K temperature range using NANOSENSORS magnetic AFM probes of the type PPP-MFMR that were magnetized prior to the measurement by applying a magnetic field of 1500 G at 10 K.

figure 8 from “Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields” by José Benito Llorens et al.:
Behavior of the hexagonal vortex lattice as a function of temperature measured with MFM. In (a)–(c), the images are taken at 2.75,3.75, and 4.5 K, respectively at 300 G. The color scale represents the observed frequency shift. Scale bar is 1μm. Blue lines are the Delaunay triangulation of vortex positions. Blue and red points in (a) highlight vortices with seven and five nearest neighbors respectively. The dark arrow at the bottom highlights the position of the vertical line discussed in the text.
figure 8 from “Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields” by José Benito Llorens et al.:
Behavior of the hexagonal vortex lattice as a function of temperature measured with MFM. In (a)–(c), the images are taken at 2.75,3.75, and 4.5 K, respectively at 300 G. The color scale represents the observed frequency shift. Scale bar is 1μm. Blue lines are the Delaunay triangulation of vortex positions. Blue and red points in (a) highlight vortices with seven and five nearest neighbors respectively. The dark arrow at the bottom highlights the position of the vertical line discussed in the text.

*José Benito Llorens, Lior Embon, Alexandre Correa, Jesús David González, Edwin Herrera, Isabel Guillamón, Roberto F. Luccas, Jon Azpeitia, Federico J. Mompeán, Mar García-Hernández, Carmen Munuera, Jazmín Aragón Sánchez, Yanina Fasano, Milorad V. Milošević, Hermann Suderow, and Yonathan Anahory
Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields
Physical Review Research 2, 013329 (2020)
DOI:10.1103/PhysRevResearch.2.013329

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://journals.aps.org/prresearch/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevResearch.2.013329

Open Access: The article “Observation of a gel of quantum vortices in a superconductor at very low magnetic fields” by José Benito Llorens, Lior Embon, Alexandre Correa, Jesús David González, Edwin Herrera, Isabel Guillamón, Roberto F. Luccas, Jon Azpeitia, Federico J. Mompeán, Mar García-Hernández, Carmen Munuera, Jazmín Aragón Sánchez, Yanina Fasano, Milorad V. Milošević, Hermann Suderow, and Yonathan Anahory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells

Iron disulfide ( FeS2 ) is a natural earth-abundant and nontoxic material with possible applications in lithium batteries, transistors or photovoltaic (PV) devices. According to the analysis carried out by Wadia et al., among 23 semiconducting materials, FeS2 is the best candidate for the development of large-scale solar cells at low cost (<2 × 10−6 ¢/W). Furthermore, FeS2 exhibits excellent optoelectronic properties such as a band gap of 0.8 to 1.38 eV, a high optical absorption coefficient (2 × 105 cm−1), high carrier mobility (2 to 80 cm2/Vs) and a large charge carrier lifetime (200 ps). Therefore, FeS2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be a good alternative for PV applications.*

In “Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells “ Olivia Amargós-Reyes, José-Luis Maldonado, Omar Martínez-Alvarez, María-Elena Nicho, José Santos-Cruz, Juan Nicasio-Collazo, Irving Caballero-Quintana and Concepción Arenas-Arrocena report the synthesis of nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide ( FeS2 ) nanocrystals (NCs) using a two-pot method. Moreover, they study the influence of these NCs incorporated into the PTB7:PC71BM active layer of bulk-heterojunction ternary organic photovoltaic ( OPV ) cells.*

The AFM roughness images presented in this article were acquired in dynamic force mode using NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCLAu AFM probes.

Figure 7 from “Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells” shows the 2D (left) and 3D (right) AFM images of the OPVs with different concentrations of FeS2 recorded in the noncontact mode. The roughness of the OPV surface is increased gradually as the FeS2 concentration increases (Table 1 and Figure 7), such that traps for the charge carriers could occur and the leakage current could increase. Because of the FeS2 agglomerates, the OPV parameters tend to decrease, free charges cannot be efficiently extracted. This effect is most prominent for the OPV cells with 1% of FeS2 (Figure 7 and Supporting Information File 1, Figure S2d).
Figure 7 from “Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells” by Olivia Amargós-Reyes et al.:
2D (left) and 3D (right) AFM images of the OPVs with different concentrations of FeS2
(a) 0.0 wt %, b) 0.25 wt %, c) 0.5 wt % and d) 1.0 wt %) recorded in noncontact mode.

*Olivia Amargós-Reyes, José-Luis Maldonado, Omar Martínez-Alvarez, María-Elena Nicho, José Santos-Cruz, Juan Nicasio-Collazo, Irving Caballero-Quintana and Concepción Arenas-Arrocena
Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells
Beilstein Journal of . Nanotechnology 2019, 10, 2238–2250.
DOI: doi:10.3762/bjnano.10.216

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjnano/articles/10/216#R65

Open Access: The article “Nontoxic pyrite iron sulfide nanocrystals as second electron acceptor in PTB7:PC71BM-based organic photovoltaic cells” by Olivia Amargós-Reyes, José-Luis Maldonado, Omar Martínez-Alvarez, María-Elena Nicho, José Santos-Cruz, Juan Nicasio-Collazo, Irving Caballero-Quintana and Concepción Arenas-Arrocena is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.