All posts by NANOSENSORS

NANOSENSORS heads the world market with its innovative high quality scanning probes for SPM (Scanning Probe Microscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). NANOSENSORS' AFM probes, AFM tips and Cantilevers contribute to many scientific breakthroughs in Nanotechnology.

Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

In their study “Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy” Kerstin Neuhaus, Giuliano Gregori and Joachim Maier show that “the combined polarization-KPFM method is able to produce consistent results for evaluation of room temperature chemical diffusion processes. In the future, a compilation of similar experiments with variation of temperature, humidity, gas surrounding etc. could also help to further study not only the role of the microstructure but also the influence of the environment on the polarization properties of other industrially relevant oxides.” *

“The samples were first mapped in the pristine state for reference. Subsequently, the sample was polarized with up to±5 V (with regard to the AFM tip) for up to 300 s. Directly after the end of the polarization experiment continuous surface potential mapping was started.”*

“For polarization and KPFM mapping, the samples were contacted with a silver paste back contact and Pt wire. The working contact for the polarization was an AFM tip (PPP-NCSTPt) with Pt coating, which was used simultaneously as probe during KPFM mapping (cf. Fig. 1).”*

Figure 1 from "Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy": Schematic of the experimental setup, NANOSENSORS PPP-NCST-Pt AFM probes were used
Figure 1 from “Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy”: Schematic of the experimental setup

*Kerstin Neuhaus, Giuliano Gregori, Joachim Maier
Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy
ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology,7 (8) P362-P368 (2018)
DOI: 10.1149/2.0011808jss

The article “Room Temperature Polarization Phenomena in Nanocrystalline and Epitaxial Thin Films of Gd-Doped Ceria Studied by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy” by Neuhaus et. al. is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/.

Get free NANOSENSORS qp-fast AFM probes at booth 610 at MRS Fall 2018

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NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-fast AFM probe
NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-fast AFM probe

 

 

 

 

 

Observing single magnetite nanoparticles with a diameter of 10nm by using NANOSENSORS SSS-MFMR AFM probes

In their publication “Understanding electrostatic and magnetic forces in magnetic force microscopy: towards single supermagnetic nanoparticle resolution” Alexander Krivcov, Tanja Junkers and Hildegard Möbius describe methods to suppress capacitive coupling effects in MFM hiding the magnetic signal of magnetic nanoparticles.

During MFM measurements performed in an interleave mode moving the tip at a certain distance to the sample surface the tip is exposed not only to magnetic forces but to electrostatic forces between tip and substrates. In case of analyzing nanoparticles laying on a flat substrate, the electrostatic forces changes noticeably with increasing tip to substrate distance whenever the tip is retracted over a nanoparticle. This capacitive signal may overwhelm the magnetic signal that should be detected instead.

The authors propose several approaches to reduce these capacitive signals. The change in electrostatic forces could be minimized by avoiding retraction of tip over the nanoparticle. Therefore, it is proposed to use interleave linear mode following a linear approximation of the sample surface instead of the interleave lift mode following the sample surface as measured. By that, changes in distance between sample substrate and tip at the nanoparticles are avoided. Moreover, they propose using a substrate with a work function comparable to that of the tip in order to reduce electrostatic forces, in general. By applying an appropriate tip bias remaining electrostatic forces could compensated and further suppressed. Finally, the authors suggest using a tip that is as sharp as possible for decreasing the area of the capacitor and NANOSENSORS SSS-MFMR probes are the best choice for this.

The impact of the above mentioned optimizations have been validated experimentally by the authors. Finally, it turned out that if using super sharp magnetic tips further methods suppressing capacitive effects were not necessary. The authors were able to detect superparamagnetic nanoparticles at the single particle level on copper substrate with a NANOSENSORS SSS-MFMR probe without using additional parameters as e. g. tip bias or external magnetic field.Figure 12 from: A. Krivcov et. al, Understanding electrostatic and magnetic forces in magnetic force microscopy: towards single supermagnetic nanoparticle resolution: Figure 12. (a) topography of copper substrate with single magnetite nanoparticle; (b) phase image in 11 nm lift height with an attraction at the place of the nanoparticle; (c) Cross section of a single magnetite nanoparticle (dotted line in (a)) with 10 nm diameter taken on copper substrate with NANOSENSORS SSS-MFMR AFM probe

Figure 12  from: A. Krivcov et. al, Understanding electrostatic and magnetic forces in magnetic force microscopy: towards single supermagnetic nanoparticle resolution: Figure 12. (a) topography of copper substrate with single magnetite nanoparticle; (b) phase image in 11 nm lift height with an attraction at the place of the nanoparticle; (c) Cross section of a single magnetite nanoparticle (dotted line in (a)) with 10 nm diameter taken on copper substrate with SSS-MFMR tip

A. Krivcov, T. Junkers, and H. Möbius
Understanding electrostatic and magnetic forces in magnetic force microscopy: towards single superparamagnetic nanoparticle resolution
J. Phys. Commun., vol. 2, no. 7, p. 075019, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/2399-6528/aad3a4

The article “Understanding electrostatic and magnetic forces in magnetic force microscopy: towards single superparamagnetic nanoparticle resolution” by A. Krivcov, T. Junkers, and H. Möbius is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0.