Tag Archives: qp-BioAC

Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments

Successful airborne transmission of coronaviruses through fluid microdroplets requires a virion structure that must withstand harsh natural conditions. *

Because of the strict biosafety requirements for the study of human respiratory viruses, it is important to develop surrogate models to facilitate their investigation. *

In the article “Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments” Miguel Cantero, Diego Carlero, Francisco Javier Chichón, Jaime Martín-Benito and Pedro José De Pablo explore the mechanical properties and nanostructure of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) virions in liquid milieu and their response to different chemical agents commonly used as biocides in their quest for a SARS-CoV2 surrogate for dynamic nanoscale structure studies that can alleviate the use of BSL3 labs that are highly demanded for biomedical and biotechnological research. *

In past few years, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to thoroughly characterize the physical properties, structure and stability of many viruses. *

It is possible to scan individual viruses, obtaining their topography and a variety of physical properties such as mechanics or electrostatics in controlled liquid milieu. Atomic Force Microscopy has provided biophysical information on all kinds of viruses, including bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses. *

For the research described in their article the authors used AFM to explore in real time the stability of individual TGEV particles as a surrogate model for SARS-CoV-2 in order to elucidate its structural stability under a range of physicochemical assaults, including mechanical stress, desiccation-rehydration cycles and treatment with chemical agents commonly used as biocides, such as detergents and ethanol. *

They also aimed to show that some structural research can be performed with non-hazardous CoV strains. *

All the described AFM experiments were carried out with NANOSENSORS™ uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probes. *

The data collected by Miguel Cantero  et al. for the article provide two-fold results on virus stability:

First, while particles with larger size and lower packing fraction kept their morphology intact after successive mechanical aggressions, smaller viruses with higher packing fraction showed conspicuous evidence of structural damage and content release.

Second, monitoring the structure of single TGEV particles in the presence of detergent and alcohol in real time revealed the stages of gradual degradation of the virus structure in situ. *

These data suggest that detergent is three orders of magnitude more efficient than alcohol in destabilizing TGEV virus particles, paving the way for optimizing hygienic protocols for viruses with similar structure, such as SARS-CoV-2. *

Figure 3 from “Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments” by Miguel Cantero et al.: Treatment of TGEV with IGEPAL 0.2% (A). Topographical images before (left) and after (right) IGEPAL treatment (B). Profiles traced over the particles before (black) and after (blue) the treatment. The time interval between images was ~30 s (C). Height distribution of TGEV particles before (black) and after (blue) treatment (n = 103). Counts taken from the distribution curve were normalized for comparison. The peak shifts from the value of the intact particle height to the height of the cores. NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probes were used for the atomic force microscopy measurements.
Figure 3 from “Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments” by Miguel Cantero et al.:
Treatment of TGEV with IGEPAL 0.2% (A). Topographical images before (left) and after (right) IGEPAL treatment (B). Profiles traced over the particles before (black) and after (blue) the treatment. The time interval between images was ~30 s (C). Height distribution of TGEV particles before (black) and after (blue) treatment (n = 103). Counts taken from the distribution curve were normalized for comparison. The peak shifts from the value of the intact particle height to the height of the cores.

*Miguel Cantero, Diego Carlero, Francisco Javier Chichón, Jaime Martín-Benito and Pedro José De Pablo
Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments
Cells 2022, 11(11), 1759
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11111759

Open Access: The article “Monitoring SARS-CoV-2 Surrogate TGEV Individual Virions Structure Survival under Harsh Physicochemical Environments” by Miguel Cantero, Diego Carlero, Francisco Javier Chichón, Jaime Martín-Benito and Pedro José De Pablo is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds

Biocompatible scaffolds that can be repopulated with human cells have many uses such serving as replacement organs and tissues. Therefore there is an increasing interest in plant-based biomaterials for tissue engineering.*

As the above mentioned scaffolds should mimic the in vivo tissue environment closely they need to provide a fitting structural and biomechanical support to the cells while at the same time promoting cell behaviour and tissue development. *

Currently the standard method to prepare plant tissue to serve as a biocompatible scaffold is to decellularize it with serial chemical treatment.*

In their article “Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds” Ashlee F. Harris, Jerome Lacombe, Sumedha Liyanage, Margaret Y. Han, Emily Wallace, Sophia Karsunky, Noureddine Abidi and Frederic Zenhausern explore another method to produce biocompatible scaffolds.*

They use supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) together with 2% peracetic acid to decellularize plant material.*

Their subsequent investigations show that the process of decellularization, scaffold structure preservation and recellularization with human cells is less time consuming than with the standard chemical method.

In a further step the authors of the article describe how they use various scientific methods to evaluate the scaffolds they decellularized by the described scCO2 method.*

Ashlee F. Harris et al. use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to find out if the scCO2 treatment had an impact on the mechanical properties of the scaffolds produced with this method.*

With AFM topography measurements they are able to establish that structures such as plant vasculature were preserved.*

The following determination of the Young’s Modulus calculated from multiple force curves of a homogeneous surface section of the produced scaffold shows it to be slightly lower than the one from a chemically decellularized scaffold.*

NANOSENSORS™ uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probes ( CB3 nominal values: 80 μm length, 30 μm mean width, 400 nm thickness, force constant 0.06 N/m, resonance frequency 30 kHz) were used for the scaffold measurements with Atomic Force Microscopy.

Figure 3 from “Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds AFM imaging and spectrometry measurement” by Ashlee F. Harris et al.: 
They used AFM surface topography measurements to confirm that the structures such as plant vasculature were preserved after the scSO2 process and used  AFM force curves to calculate the  Young’s Modulus (YM) of the scCO2 decellularized scaffold. NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probes were used for the described AFM measurments. 
(a) Representative false colored three-dimensional surface mapping images and (b) Young’s modulus of scCO2 and chemically decellularized scaffolds (data as mean ± SEM; n = 5).
Figure 3 from “Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds AFM imaging and spectrometry measurement” by Ashlee F. Harris et al.: (a) Representative false colored three-dimensional surface mapping images and (b) Young’s modulus of scCO2 and chemically decellularized scaffolds (data as mean ± SEM; n = 5).

While the scCo2 method promises to be a faster way to decellularize plant material and produce sterile and biocompatible scaffolds further research will be necessary to determine whether the differences the authors detected between the scaffolds produced with the scCO2 approach and the scaffolds produced with the chemical approach have a major influence on how repopulated cells behave in the achieved scaffolds.*

*Ashlee F. Harris, Jerome Lacombe, Sumedha Liyanage, Margaret Y. Han, Emily Wallace, Sophia Karsunky, Noureddine Abidi and Frederic Zenhausern
Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds
Nature Scientific Reports 11, 3643 (2021)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-83250-9

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/cAqW3

Open Access The article “Supercritical carbon dioxide decellularization of plant material to generate 3D biocompatible scaffolds” by Ashlee F. Harris, Jerome Lacombe, Sumedha Liyanage, Margaret Y. Han, Emily Wallace, Sophia Karsunky, Noureddine Abidi and Frederic Zenhausern is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability

Muscle wasting is connected with changes in various cellular mechanisms that influence protein homeostasis, transcription, protein acetylation and different metabolic pathways. *

Scientific studies have shown that reduced levels of polyadenylation binding protein 1 ( PABPN1 , a multifactorial regulator of mRNA processing ) cause muscle wasting, including muscle atrophy, extracellular matrix thickening, myofiber typing transitions and central nucleation. *

However, the cellular mechanisms behind PABPN1-mediated muscle wasting are not fully understood. *

In the article “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler and Vered Raz examine the cytoskeletal auxiliary changes that are dependent on PABPN1 levels using 2D and 3D models, and investigate how these affect muscle wasting. *

They suggest that poor cytoskeletal mechanical features are caused by altered expression levels of cytoskeletal proteins and contribute to muscle wasting and atrophy. *

For the measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells ( muscle cells with reduced PABPN1 levels ) the authors used Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. *

NANOSENSORS™ uniqprobe qp-BioAC ( CB3 ) AFM probes were used in the quantitative imaging where a force curve is applied at each point. The analyzed area of each cell was 5 µm × 5 µm (64 × 64 pixels) with an approach speed of 35 µm/s (3.4 ms/pixel), and applied forces of up to 118 pN. *

Figure 4 from “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie et al.
 Disrupted cytoskeletal spatial organization in shPAB human muscle cell cultures. A Representative images of control and shPAB human muscle cell cultures, stained with antibodies to tubulin and actin, and the actin filaments were visualized with actin-GFP. B Tubulin staining in control and shPAB myoblast cell cultures after DMSO, 100 nM nocodazole or 25 nM paclitaxel treatment for 2 h. Scale bar is 25 µm. C Measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells using the Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy (Ci) or the Atomic Force Microscopy (Cii). Measurements were carried out in myoblasts; every dot represents the median from 1000 measurements in a cell. Cell stiffness is measured by GHz, and the young modulus reports the cell surface tension. Averages and standard deviations are from N = 15 cells. Statistical significance was calculated with the student’s t-test.
NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC ( CB3 ) AFM probes were used in the quantitative imaging of cell-mechanics properties.
Figure 4 from “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie et al.
 Disrupted cytoskeletal spatial organization in shPAB human muscle cell cultures. A Representative images of control and shPAB human muscle cell cultures, stained with antibodies to tubulin and actin, and the actin filaments were visualized with actin-GFP. B Tubulin staining in control and shPAB myoblast cell cultures after DMSO, 100 nM nocodazole or 25 nM paclitaxel treatment for 2 h. Scale bar is 25 µm. C Measurements of cell-mechanics properties in control and shPAB cells using the Brillouin Light Scattering Microscopy (Ci) or the Atomic Force Microscopy (Cii). Measurements were carried out in myoblasts; every dot represents the median from 1000 measurements in a cell. Cell stiffness is measured by GHz, and the young modulus reports the cell surface tension. Averages and standard deviations are from N = 15 cells. Statistical significance was calculated with the student’s t-test.

*Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler & Vered Raz
Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability
Nature Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 17621 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-74676-8

Please follow this external link to read the full article https://rdcu.be/ceyJ4

Open Access: The article “Cytoskeletal disorganization underlies PABPN1-mediated myogenic disability” by Cyriel Sebastiaan Olie, Erik van der Wal, Cikes Domagoj, Loes Maton, Jessica C. de Greef, I.-Hsuan Lin, Yi-Fan Chen, Elsayad Kareem, Josef M. Penninger, Benedikt M. Kessler & Vered Raz is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.