Tag Archives: nanomaterials

Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures

Discrete block co-oligomers (BCOs) can form highly ordered ultrasmall nanostructures which can be used for lithographic templates. These nanotemplates are promising for the low-cost, large-scale, and high-throughput production of sub-10 nm nanomaterials and nanodevices. However, work-intensive synthetic routes can be an obstacle to their practical application. *

In “Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures” Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh report the development of a readily available monodisperse and discrete block co-oligomer (BCO) system consisting of hydrophilic sugars and hydrophobic terpenoids that is capable of forming various self-assembled nanostructures with ultrasmall periodicity.*

The authors believe that the BCOs presented in their publication have the potential to contribute to accelerating applied research of solid and solution state self-assembly of discrete and monodisperse BCOs, thereby expanding their application scopes in various fields of not only the nanolithography but also organic devices, separation materials, coatings, etc.*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCHR standard tapping mode AFM probes and SuperSharpSilicon™  SSS-NCHR high resolution (typical AFM tip radius 2nm)  silicon AFM probes for tapping mode/non-contact mode applications were used for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images presented in the article.

Fig. 4 from : Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures by Takuya Isono et al. Thin-film morphologies of Glc3-b-Sol and Glc4-b-Sol. AFM height images (a, b) and corresponding cross-sectional profiles (c, d) indicating the formation of 6–8-nm-thick horizontal lamellae in Glc3-b-Sol (a, c) and Glc4-b-Sol thin films (b, d). Thin-film samples were prepared by spin-coating the BCO solution onto the hydrophilic surface of a silicon substrate followed by thermal annealing at 85 °C for 1 h. NANOSENSORS PointProbe Plus PPP-NCHR standard silicon tapping mode AFM probes and NANOSENSORS SuperSharpSilicon high resolution silicon AFM probes were used
Fig. 4 from : Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures by Takuya Isono et al.
Thin-film morphologies of Glc3-b-Sol and Glc4-b-Sol.
AFM height images (a, b) and corresponding cross-sectional profiles (c, d) indicating the formation of 6–8-nm-thick horizontal lamellae in Glc3-b-Sol (a, c) and Glc4-b-Sol thin films (b, d). Thin-film samples were prepared by spin-coating the BCO solution onto the hydrophilic surface of a silicon substrate followed by thermal annealing at 85 °C for 1 h.

*Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh
Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures
Nature Communications  Chemistry 3, 135 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42004-020-00385-y

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/cNeH4

Open Access: The article “Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures” by Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges

In the article “Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges” Wen Wang, Ashu Wang and Lingyan Zeng describe how they used friction force microscopy ( FFM ) under ultrahigh vacuum ( UHV) conditions to study the temperature dependence of nanoscale friction between a silicon AFM tip ( NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-LFMR AFM probe for lateral/friction force microscopy ) and a freshly cleaved HOPG surface with exposed single- and double-layer step edges.*

They present experimental measurements as well as theoretical calculations of the temperature effects on atomic friction across HOPG surface step edges.*

Among other things the authors found that the resistive force for the double-layer step edge was twice as large as that of the single-step edge, and simultaneously, the assistive force that resulted from the horizontal component of the total force acting on the AFM tip seemed to be less influenced by the height of the step edges.*

Their experimental results also showed that temperature had very little effect on the friction coefficients at the step edges, which is inconsistent with the thermal activated friction where friction should decrease with temperature.*

Based on the theoretical studies, this observation can be explained by a process where the temperature effect is very small compared with the edge Schwoebel–Ehrlich barrier.*

The authors hope that their findings will contribute to understanding the temperature effects on macroscopic friction having a lot of step edges at the interface.*

Figure 1 from “Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges” by Wen Wang et al.:
 Experimental setup and the topographic image of the HOPG surface with step edges used in our measurements. (a) Illustration of the experimental setup. All experiments have been performed using a conventional friction force microscope on a freshly cleaved HOPG sample which was in contact with the temperature control stage under UHV conditions. (b) The typical topographic image of the HOPG surface with a single- and double-layer step edge obtained at T = 297.7 K using the contact mode operation with an applied normal force of 13.1 nN and a scan velocity of 1.25 μm/s. (c) The cross-section height profile across the step edges highlighted in (b). The black arrows in (b) and (c) indicate the scanning direction.  NANOSENSORS PointProbe Plus PPP-LFMR AFM probes for lateral force microscopy and friction force microscopy were used.
Figure 1 from “Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges” by Wen Wang et al.:
 Experimental setup and the topographic image of the HOPG surface with step edges used in our measurements. (a) Illustration of the experimental setup. All experiments have been performed using a conventional friction force microscope on a freshly cleaved HOPG sample which was in contact with the temperature control stage under UHV conditions. (b) The typical topographic image of the HOPG surface with a single- and double-layer step edge obtained at T = 297.7 K using the contact mode operation with an applied normal force of 13.1 nN and a scan velocity of 1.25 μm/s. (c) The cross-section height profile across the step edges highlighted in (b). The black arrows in (b) and (c) indicate the scanning direction.

*Wen Wang, Ashu Wang and Lingyan Zeng
Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges
AIP Advances 10, 085322 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0019196

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/5.0019196

Open Access The article “Temperature effects on the nano-friction across exposed atomic step edges” by Wen Wang, Ashu Wang and Lingyan Zeng is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Multi-Channel Exploration of O Adatom on TiO2(110) Surface by Scanning Probe Microscopy

In the article “Multi-Channel Exploration of O Adatom on TiO2(110) Surface by Scanning Probe Microscopy” Huan Fei Wen, Yasuhiro Sugawara and Yan Jun describe how they studied the O2 dissociated state under the different O2 exposed temperatures with atomic resolution by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and imaged the O adatom by simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM)/scanning tunneling microscopy (STM).*

The effect of AFM operation mode on O adatom contrast was investigated, and the interaction of O adatom and the subsurface defect was observed by AFM/STM. Multi-channel exploration was performed to investigate the charge transfer between the adsorbed O and the TiO2(110) by obtaining the frequency shift, tunneling current and local contact potential difference at an atomic scale. The tunneling current image showed the difference of the tunneling possibility on the single O adatom and paired O adatoms, and the local contact potential difference distribution of the O-TiO2(110) surface institutively revealed the charge transfer from TiO2(110) surface to O adatom. The experimental results are expected to be helpful in investigating surface/interface properties by SPM. *

Iridium-coated ultrastiff AFM cantilever SD-T10L100 from the NANOSENSORS Special Developments List (typical Force constant 2 000 N/m) were used in the presented study.

The cantilever tip was first degassed at approximately 650 K for 30 min and then cleaned by Ar ion bombardment to remove the contaminants, prior to the measurements. Features of the surface structure were related to the charge states of the tip apex, and a stable tip was essential to accurately characterize the surface structure and properties in the experiment. The imaging mode became stable in AFM experiments when the metal-coated Si cantilever was employed in the experiments. *

Figure 5. from “Multiple images of TiO2(110) surface with atomic resolution and corresponding line profiles” by Huan Fei Wen et al. - Iridium coated NANOSENSORS SD-T10L100 AFM probes were used
(a) Frequency shift (∆f) image, (b) tunneling current (<It>) image and (c) local contact potential difference (VLCPD) image. (d,e) The line profiles along the blue line on the surface in (b,c). (f0 = 805 kHz, Q = 27623, ∆f = −260 Hz, VDC = 1.3 V, VAC = 1.5 V, A = 500 pm, size: 3.5 × 3.2 nm2). Multiple images of TiO2(110) surface with atomic resolution and corresponding line profiles. (a) Frequency shift (∆f) image, (b) tunneling current (<It>) image and (c) local contact potential difference (VLCPD) image. (d,e) The line profiles along the blue line on the surface in (b,c). (f0 = 805 kHz, Q = 27623, ∆f = −260 Hz, VDC = 1.3 V, VAC = 1.5 V, A = 500 pm, size: 3.5 × 3.2 nm2).

Figure 5. from “Multiple images of TiO2(110) surface with atomic resolution and corresponding line profiles” by Huan Fei Wen et al.
(a) Frequency shift (∆f) image, (b) tunneling current (<It>) image and (c) local contact potential difference (VLCPD) image. (d,e) The line profiles along the blue line on the surface in (b,c). (f0 = 805 kHz, Q = 27623, ∆f = −260 Hz, VDC = 1.3 V, VAC = 1.5 V, A = 500 pm, size: 3.5 × 3.2 nm2). Multiple images of TiO2(110) surface with atomic resolution and corresponding line profiles. (a) Frequency shift (∆f) image, (b) tunneling current (<It>) image and (c) local contact potential difference (VLCPD) image. (d,e) The line profiles along the blue line on the surface in (b,c). (f0 = 805 kHz, Q = 27623, ∆f = −260 Hz, VDC = 1.3 V, VAC = 1.5 V, A = 500 pm, size: 3.5 × 3.2 nm2).

*Huan Fei Wen, Yasuhiro Sugawara and Yan Jun
Multi-Channel Exploration of O Adatom on TiO2(110) Surface by Scanning Probe Microscopy
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(8), 1506
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10081506

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://www.mdpi.com/2079-4991/10/8/1506/htm

More articles mentioning the use of NANOSENSORS ultrastiff AFM probes:

Yuuki Adachi, Huan Fei Wen, Quanzhen Zhang, Masato Miyazaki, Yasuhiro Sugawara and Yan Jun Li
Elucidating the charge state of an Au nanocluster on the oxidized/reduced rutile TiO2 (110) surface using non-contact atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy
Nanoscale Adv., 2020, 2, 2371-2375 (Paper)
DOI: 10.1039/C9NA00776H
https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2020/na/c9na00776h

Huan Fei Wen, Hongqian Sang Yasuhiro Sugawara, and Yan Jun Li
Dynamic behavior of OH and its atomic contrast with O adatom on the Ti site of TiO2(110) at 78 K by atomic force microscopy imaging
Appl. Phys. Lett. 117, 051602 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0016657

Yuuki Adachi, Yasuhiro Sugawara, and Yan Jun Li
Remotely Controlling the Charge State of Oxygen Adatoms on a Rutile TiO2(110) Surface Using Atomic Force Microscopy
J. Phys. Chem. C 2020, 124, 22, 12010–12015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.0c03117

Huan Fei Wen, Quanzhen Zhang, Yuuki Adachi, Masato Miyazaki, Yasuhiro Sugawara, Yan JunLi
Contrast inversion of O adatom on rutile TiO2(1 1 0)-(1 × 1) surface by atomic force microscopy imaging
Applied Surface Science Volume 505, 1 March 2020, 144623
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2019.144623

Open Access The article “Multi-Channel Exploration of O Adatom on TiO2(110) Surface by Scanning Probe Microscopy” by Huan Fei Wen, Yasuhiro Sugawara and Yan Jun is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.