Tag Archives: PPP-NCHR

Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures

Discrete block co-oligomers (BCOs) can form highly ordered ultrasmall nanostructures which can be used for lithographic templates. These nanotemplates are promising for the low-cost, large-scale, and high-throughput production of sub-10 nm nanomaterials and nanodevices. However, work-intensive synthetic routes can be an obstacle to their practical application. *

In “Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures” Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh report the development of a readily available monodisperse and discrete block co-oligomer (BCO) system consisting of hydrophilic sugars and hydrophobic terpenoids that is capable of forming various self-assembled nanostructures with ultrasmall periodicity.*

The authors believe that the BCOs presented in their publication have the potential to contribute to accelerating applied research of solid and solution state self-assembly of discrete and monodisperse BCOs, thereby expanding their application scopes in various fields of not only the nanolithography but also organic devices, separation materials, coatings, etc.*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCHR standard tapping mode AFM probes and SuperSharpSilicon™  SSS-NCHR high resolution (typical AFM tip radius 2nm)  silicon AFM probes for tapping mode/non-contact mode applications were used for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase images presented in the article.

Fig. 4 from : Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures by Takuya Isono et al. Thin-film morphologies of Glc3-b-Sol and Glc4-b-Sol. AFM height images (a, b) and corresponding cross-sectional profiles (c, d) indicating the formation of 6–8-nm-thick horizontal lamellae in Glc3-b-Sol (a, c) and Glc4-b-Sol thin films (b, d). Thin-film samples were prepared by spin-coating the BCO solution onto the hydrophilic surface of a silicon substrate followed by thermal annealing at 85 °C for 1 h. NANOSENSORS PointProbe Plus PPP-NCHR standard silicon tapping mode AFM probes and NANOSENSORS SuperSharpSilicon high resolution silicon AFM probes were used
Fig. 4 from : Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures by Takuya Isono et al.
Thin-film morphologies of Glc3-b-Sol and Glc4-b-Sol.
AFM height images (a, b) and corresponding cross-sectional profiles (c, d) indicating the formation of 6–8-nm-thick horizontal lamellae in Glc3-b-Sol (a, c) and Glc4-b-Sol thin films (b, d). Thin-film samples were prepared by spin-coating the BCO solution onto the hydrophilic surface of a silicon substrate followed by thermal annealing at 85 °C for 1 h.

*Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh
Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures
Nature Communications  Chemistry 3, 135 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42004-020-00385-y

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/cNeH4

Open Access: The article “Rapid access to discrete and monodisperse block co-oligomers from sugar and terpenoid toward ultrasmall periodic nanostructures” by Takuya Isono, Ryoya Komaki, Chaehun Lee, Nao Kawakami, Bian J. Ree, Kodai Watanabe, Kohei Yoshida, Hiroaki Mamiya, Takuya Yamamoto, Redouane Borsali, Kenji Tajima and Toshifumi Satoh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier

Surgery, particularly open surgery, is known to cause tissue/organ adhesion during healing. These adhesions occur through contact between the surgical treatment site and other organ, bone, or abdominal sites. Fibrous bands can form in unnecessary contact areas and cause various complications. Consequently, film- and gel-type anti-adhesion agents have been developed. The development of sustained drug delivery systems is very important for disease treatment and prevention.*

In “Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier” Seungho Baek, Heekyung Park, Youngah Park, Hyun Kang and Donghyun Lee describe how the drug release behavior was controlled by crosslinking lidocaine-loaded alginate/carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/polyethylene oxide (PEO) nanofiber films prepared by electrospinning.*

Lidocaine is mainly used as an anesthetic and is known to have anti-adhesion effects.*

Based on the results presented in the article, this study shows that the drug release behavior can be controlled by using CaCl2 as a nontoxic crosslinking agent to produce a good anti-adhesion barrier that can prevent unnecessary tissue adhesion at a surgical site.*

The authors selected atomic force microscopy (AFM) using NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCHR AFM cantilevers to analyze the electrospun films.*

Figure 3 from “Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier” by Seungho Baek et al.:
Morphological and surface characterization of the 9% (w/v) alginate/CMC/PEO nanofiber film. Analyses used the noncontact mode of atomic microscopy. (a–c) are the same films at different scales (scale bars 40 µm, 15 µm, and 5 µm).
Figure 3 from “Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier” by Seungho Baek et al.:
Morphological and surface characterization of the 9% (w/v) alginate/CMC/PEO nanofiber film. Analyses used the noncontact mode of atomic microscopy. (a–c) are the same films at different scales (scale bars 40 µm, 15 µm, and 5 µm).

*Seungho Baek, Heekyung Park, Youngah Park, Hyun Kang and Donghyun Lee
Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier
Polymers 2020, 12(3), 618
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12030618

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4360/12/3/618/htm

Open Access: The article “Development of a Lidocaine-Loaded Alginate/CMC/PEO Electrospun Nanofiber Film and Application as an Anti-Adhesion Barrier” by Seungho Baek, Heekyung Park, Youngah Park, Hyun Kang and Donghyun Lee is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure

In the research article “5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure” Yuting Yan, Yanwei Cao, Chunsheng Xiao, Yang Li, Xiaoxuan Xiang and Xinhua Guo demonstratethat the connection of duplex-forming sequences with a G-quadruplex-forming sequence (G6) could be used to construct DNA supramolecular nanostructures with alternating B-duplex and G-quadruplex structures. Their results demonstrate that the TT linker between B-duplex and G-quadruplex structures are necessary for the construction of such nanostructures, because the TT linker can provide structural flexibility for the bending of duplexes at the terminal of G-quadruplex.*

The formation of DNA supramolecular nanostructures was directly observed through AFM measurements.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was performed using NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCHR tapping mode AFM probes.

Figure 5. from “5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure” by Yuting Yan et al.: AFM images of the nanostructures formed by DNA G-quadruplexes self-assembly in KOAc buffer solution; (a,b) SG2 at pH 9.0, (c,d) SG2 at pH 4.5, (e,f) a mixture of SG2 and CSG2 at pH 4.5, (g,h) a mixture of SG2 and CSG2 at pH 9.0. The length of side is 2 µm and the scale bar is 500 nm. NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCHR AFM probes were used for all AFM images.
Figure 5. from “5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure” by Yuting Yan et al.: AFM images of the nanostructures formed by DNA G-quadruplexes self-assembly in KOAc buffer solution; (a,b) SG2 at pH 9.0, (c,d) SG2 at pH 4.5, (e,f) a mixture of SG2 and CSG2 at pH 4.5, (g,h) a mixture of SG2 and CSG2 at pH 9.0. The length of side is 2 µm and the scale bar is 500 nm.

AFM microscopy was performed on the fresh mica surfaces with the help of magnesium ions which can bind negatively charged DNA strands. The DNA samples were annealed at 100 µM in 100 mM K+ solution at 4°C for one week. Then aliquots were diluted with 2 mM MgCl2 aqueous solution to give a 20 µl analyte containing 1.5 µM DNA. The analytes were spread evenly on the mica surface for 5–8 min. Subsequently, the mica surface was washed with Milli-Q water to wipe off the excess salt, and finally dried in the air.*

*Yuting Yan, Yanwei Cao, Chunsheng Xiao, Yang Li, Xiaoxuan Xiang, Xinhua Guo
5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure
Royal Society Open Science, 1 August 2018, Volume 5, Issue 8
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.180123

Open Access: The article “5′-(CGA)n sequence-assisted pH-controlled assembly of supramolecular DNA nanostructure” by  Yuting Yan et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.