Tag Archives: biochemistry

Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces

The human skin is the second largest organ of the human body. The stratum corneum (SC) is the outmost layer of the human skin and performs various protective and adaptive physiological functions such as protecting against physical, chemical and biological damages.*

The homeostasis of the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum is essential for the correct functioning of the SC. If the composition of this lipid matrix is changed or disturbed skin ailments such as atopic dermatitis or psoriasis can be the result. According to various studies direct replenishment of the SC lipids on damaged skin has positive effects on the recovery of its barrier properties.*

Cerosomes or stratum corneum liposomes are a relatively new class of liposomes which are being investigated for the application as skin barrier repairing agents in chronical skin diseases.*

In the article “Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces” Fabio Strati, Tetiana Mukhina, Reinhard H. H. Neubert, Lukas Opalka, Gerd Hause, Christian E. H. Schmelzer, Matthias Menzel, Gerald Brezesinski describe how they prepared cerosomes, i.E. liposomes composed of SC lipids in order to investigate the mechanism of interaction with a 2D model of the SC lipid matrix.*

After a first step of characterizing the used SC model monolayer in detail they carried out the development of stable SC liposomes, the so-called cerosomes, in a second step.*

Once the cerosome formulations were developed and characterized, the interaction between these and monolayers of the SC lipid matrix model was investigated.*

The interaction was probed by means of adsorption isotherms after subphase injection, and after the transfer to a solid support by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements.*

The AFM experiments were performed to gain information about the structures of the formed assemblies. This technique allows to resolve the lateral organization and to visualize the presence of lipid domains and/or adsorbed vesicles be performing topographic surface measurements of the sample deposited onto a solid support with an Angstrom resolution in transversal direction.*

Topographical images were recorded in liquid state using NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioT AFM probes in a standard liquid cell containing the needed buffer.*

The results obtained with the application of AFM showed that the liposomes were able to both penetrate into empty spaces and lower domains present in the SC model monolayer and get adsorbed at the monolayer forming localized multilayers.*

The results presented in the article indicate that a strong interaction occurred between SC monolayers and the cerosomes.*

The study proves for the first time the mode of action by which cerosomes exploit their function as skin barrier repairing agents on the SC.*

The use of such formulations might not only be limited to restore the damaged skin but they could be also used to deliver active pharmaceutical ingredients encapsulated in the cerosomes. This might open new and interesting scenarios for treating skin conditions such as inflammations caused by atopic dermatitis and/or psoriasis.*

Fig. 7 from “Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces” by F. Strati et al: AFM scans of a) SC model monolayer transferred via LB method onto mica support, b) SC model monolayer after injection of cerosomes, c) SC model monolayer after injection of cerosome + S75-3 formulation, and d) SC model monolayer after injection of S75-3 liposomal formulation. All samples were transferred via the LS method onto glass substrate. Each experiment was performed at 20°C and the subphase used for a) was Millipore water while for b), c), and d) the same aqueous solutions have been used as for the formulation of the liposomes. Topographical images were recorded in liquid state using NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioT AFM probes in a standard liquid cell containing the needed buffer.
Fig. 7 from “Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces” by F. Strati et al: AFM scans of a) SC model monolayer transferred via LB method onto mica support, b) SC model monolayer after injection of cerosomes, c) SC model monolayer after injection of cerosome + S75-3 formulation, and d) SC model monolayer after injection of S75-3 liposomal formulation. All samples were transferred via the LS method onto glass substrate. Each experiment was performed at 20°C and the subphase used for a) was Millipore water while for b), c), and d) the same aqueous solutions have been used as for the formulation of the liposomes.

 

*Fabio Strati, Tetiana Mukhina, Reinhard H. H. Neubert, Lukas Opalka, Gerd Hause, Christian E. H. Schmelzer, Matthias Menzel, Gerald Brezesinski
Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces
BBA Advances, Volume 2, 2022, 100039
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbadva.2021.100039

Please follow this external link to read the full article:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbadva.2021.100039

Open Access: The article “Cerosomes as skin repairing agent: Mode of action studies with a model stratum corneum layer at liquid/air and liquid/solid interfaces” by Fabio Strati, Tetiana Mukhina, Reinhard H. H. Neubert, Lukas Opalka, Gerd Hause, Christian E. H. Schmelzer, Matthias Menzel, Gerald Brezesinski is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

cdS quantum dots-based immunoassay combined with particle imprinted polymer technology and laser ablation icp-MS as a versatile tool for protein detection

The molecularly imprinted polymer ( MIP ) technology is currently experiencing a rapid development due to the limitations of natural recognition elements such antibodies or aptamers.*

However, neither MIP strategies are limitless. Therefore, the combination of these powerful tools in a specific immunoassay may bring highly selective approach.*
In their article “cdS quantum dots-based immunoassay combined with particle imprinted polymer technology and laser ablation icp-MS as a versatile tool for protein detection” Tereza Vaneckova, Jaroslava Bezdekova, Michaela Tvrdonova, Marcela Vlcnovska, Veronika Novotna, Jan Neuman, Aneta Stossova, Viktor  Kanicky, Vojtech Adam, Marketa Vaculovicova and  Tomas Vaculovic introduce a MIP-based pseudo-immunoassay using NP-labelled antibody recognition and couple it with the sensitive detection technique  laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ( LA-ICP-MS ).*

Two approaches of specific recognition were tested.
The first one was based on the immunolabelling of the analyte captured by the MIP layer.
The second approach involved immunolabelling of the analyte as a first step and the resulting QD-AB-AG complex was captured by MIP and further analyzed.
The double-selective approach comprising of the specific immunolabelling reaction combined with isolation by MIP together with the LA-ICP-MS detection represents a viable approach of the IgG detection from a complex sample (LOD 4.2 μg and 1.6 μg, respectively) available for many exciting applications.
Considering the overall time of the LA-ICP-MS analysis not exceeding 23 s (scan speed of 2000 μm/s), LA-ICP-MS is a promising technology to be used in future in conjunction with MIP technology.*

The sample surface was analyzed using SEM with integrated AFM. Correlative Probe and Electron Microscopy (CPEM)48 was used for the surface analysis allowing simultaneous acquisition of SEM and AFM images at the same place in the same coordinate system. The SEM contrast is sensitive to the sample composition, while the AFM provides real surface topography. The accelerating voltage of 5 kV, beam current of 13 pA and SE detector was used for SEM imaging.*
NANOSENSORS self-sensing self-actuating Akiyama probes in tapping mode were used for the AFM measurement.


Figure 3 c from: «CdS quantum dots-based immunoassay combined with particle imprinted polymer technology and laser ablation ICP-MS as a versatile tool for protein detection» by Tereza Vaneckova et al.
(C) Correlative Probe and Electron Microscopy (CPEM) imaging of MIP layer with imprinted QD-AB conjugate. 1 – SEM image, 2 – AFM image of the same area and sample in the same coordinate system. 3 – profile of a well formed due to the imprinting process.
In Fig. 3C, the surface visualization obtained by Correlative Probe and Electron Microscopy (CPEM) is shown. SEM image (1) and AFM image (2) were obtained simultaneously from the same region of the sample. Mainly two regions of the surface are of our interest (red and blue circle). Even though SEM image shows similar contrast of both regions, AFM imaging clearly confirms differences between the flat surface (blue circle) and wells formed due to the imprinting process (red circle). Profile of one of the wells is shown in (3). *
NANOSENSORS self-sensing and self-actuating Akiyama-probe AFM probe
NANOSENSORS self-sensing and self-actuating Akiyama-probe

*Tereza Vaneckova, Jaroslava Bezdekova, Michaela Tvrdonova, Marcela Vlcnovska, Veronika Novotna, Jan Neuman, Aneta Stossova, Viktor  Kanicky, Vojtech Adam, Marketa Vaculovicova, Tomas Vaculovic
cdS quantum dots-based immunoassay combined with particle imprinted polymer technology and laser ablation icp-MS as a versatile tool for protein detection
nature, Scientific Reports, (2019) 9:11840
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-48290-2

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/bXosX

Open Access The article “CdS quantum dots-based immunoassay combined with particle imprinted polymer technology and laser ablation ICP-MS as a versatile tool for protein detection” by Tereza Vaneckova, Jaroslava Bezdekova, Michaela Tvrdonova, Marcela Vlcnovska, Veronika Novotna, Jan Neuman, Aneta Stossova, Viktor  Kanicky, Vojtech Adam, Marketa Vaculovicova and Tomas Vaculovic is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.