Tag Archives: AFMtips

Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure

Electrical manipulation of skyrmions attracts considerable attention for its rich physics and promising applications. To date, such a manipulation is realized mainly via spin-polarized current based on spin-transfer torque or spin–orbital torque effect.*

However, this scheme is energy consuming and may produce massive Joule heating. To reduce energy dissipation and risk of heightened temperatures of skyrmion-based devices, an effective solution is to use electric field instead of current as stimulus.*

In the article “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure”, Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu realize an electric-field manipulation of skyrmions in a nanostructured ferromagnetic/ferroelectrical heterostructure at room temperature via an inverse magneto-mechanical effect.*

Intriguingly, such a manipulation is non-volatile and exhibits a multistate feature. Numerical simulations indicate that the electric-field manipulation of skyrmions originates from strain-mediated modification of effective magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction.*

The results presented in the article open a direction for constructing low-energy-dissipation, non-volatile, and multistate skyrmion-based spintronic devices.*

To minimize the influence of the magnetic field from the MFM tip on the magnetic domain structure during the magnetic force microscopy ( MFM ) measurements, NANOSENSORS™ PPP-LM-MFMR low moment magnetic AFM probes were used.*

These MFM probes are designed for magnetic force microscopy with reduced disturbance of the magnetic sample by the tip and enhanced lateral resolution compared to the standard PPP-MFMR probe. The distance between the tip and sample was maintained at a constant distance of 30 nm.*

Figure 2 from “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang et al.:
Electric-field-induced switching of individual skyrmion.
The transferred average strain εave and corresponding magnetic domain evolution processes in the d ~ 350 nm a [Pt/Co/Ta]12 and b [Pt/Co/Ta]8 nano-dots in a cycle of E ranging from +10 to −10 kV cm−1. Positive εave (red dots) represents tensile strain while negative εave (blue dots) represents compressive strain. μ0H represents the external magnetic field except that from the MFM tip and here μ0H is equal to be 0 mT. The inset of b illustrates the spin texture of the magnetic domain that is encompassed by the red box. The stripe domain enclosed by the black box shows the initial state of the magnetic domain evolution path. The gray dots represent the corresponding electric field for the MFM images. The MFM contrast represents the MFM tip resonant frequency shift (Δf). The scale bar represents 250 nm.

NANOSENSORS™ PPP-LM-MFMR low moment magnetic AFM probes were used
Figure 2 from “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang et al.:
Electric-field-induced switching of individual skyrmion.
The transferred average strain εave and corresponding magnetic domain evolution processes in the d ~ 350 nm a [Pt/Co/Ta]12 and b [Pt/Co/Ta]8 nano-dots in a cycle of E ranging from +10 to −10 kV cm−1. Positive εave (red dots) represents tensile strain while negative εave (blue dots) represents compressive strain. μ0H represents the external magnetic field except that from the MFM tip and here μ0H is equal to be 0 mT. The inset of b illustrates the spin texture of the magnetic domain that is encompassed by the red box. The stripe domain enclosed by the black box shows the initial state of the magnetic domain evolution path. The gray dots represent the corresponding electric field for the MFM images. The MFM contrast represents the MFM tip resonant frequency shift (Δf). The scale bar represents 250 nm.

*Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu
Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure
Nature Communications volume 11, Article no. 3577 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17354-7

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/b6qpr

Open Access: The article “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

DNA looping by two 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins quantified using nanofluidic devices

MeCP2 and MBD2 are members of a family of proteins that possess a domain that selectively binds 5-methylcytosine in a CpG context. Members of the family interact with other proteins to modulate DNA packing. Stretching of DNA–protein complexes in nanofluidic channels with a cross-section of a few persistence lengths allows us to probe the degree of compaction by proteins.*

In the article “DNA looping by two 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins quantified using nanofluidic devices” Ming Liu, Saeid Movahed, Saroj Dangi, Hai Pan, Parminder Kaur, Stephanie M. Bilinovich, Edgar M. Faison, Gage O. Leighton, Hong Wang, David C. Williams Jr. and Robert Riehn demonstrate DNA compaction by MeCP2 while MBD2 does not affect DNA configuration. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), they determined that the mechanism for compaction by MeCP2 is the formation of bridges between distant DNA stretches and the formation of loops.*

Despite sharing a similar specific DNA-binding domain, the impact of full-length 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins can vary drastically between strong compaction of DNA and no discernible large-scale impact of protein binding. The authors of the article demonstrate that ATTO 565-labeled MBD2 is a good candidate as a staining agent for epigenetic mapping.*

For atomic force microscopy (AFM), the authors used a 7,163-bp linear DNA substrate which contains a 1,697-bp methylated CpG-rich region that is flanked by 2,742-bp and 2,724-bp CpG-free regions. For MeCP2, the DNA substrate and the protein were diluted in AFM imaging buffer (HEPES 20 mM, Mg(OAc)210mM, NaCl 100mM, pH 7.5), mixed together and deposited on freshly peeled mica. For MBD2FLsc, the authors describe how they first mixed the protein and DNA and then diluted the sample in AFM buffer before deposition. The final MeCP2 concentration deposited on mica was 7.5nM, and the MBD2FLsc concentration was 14nM. The mica samples were then washed with filtered deionized water and dried with nitrogen.*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-FMR AFM probes ( ≈2.8N/m) were used to image the sample at a scan resolution of 5.9nm and a scan rate of 3μm/s.*

Figure 6 from “DNA looping by two 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins quantified using nanofluidic devices “ by Ming Liu et al.:
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of methylated substrates under various conditions. AFM of bare methylated dsDNA oligomer a, the same oligomer with MBD2Flsc b, and with MeCP2 c. Scale bars are 200nm. The green arrows point at ends, and cyan arrows point at loops. The inset in d illustrates the counting method for loops. The distribution of number of free ends (d) and the distribution of number of loops (e) for DNA or DNA–protein complexes was determined from such images (bare DNA N=118, MBD2FLsc N=98, MeCP2 N=108). f Height of isolated DNA–DNA crossings (bare DNA N=52, MBD2FLsc N=68, MeCP2 N=83)

*Ming Liu, Saeid Movahed, Saroj Dangi, Hai Pan, Parminder Kaur, Stephanie M. Bilinovich, Edgar M. Faison, Gage O. Leighton, Hong Wang, David C. Williams Jr. and Robert Riehn
DNA looping by two 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins quantified using nanofluidic devices
Epigenetics & Chromatin volume 13, Article number: 18 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13072-020-00339-7

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/b3iTm

Open Access: The article “DNA looping by two 5-methylcytosine-binding proteins quantified using nanofluidic devices” by Ming Liu, Saeid Movahed, Saroj Dangi, Hai Pan, Parminder Kaur, Stephanie M. Bilinovich, Edgar M. Faison, Gage O. Leighton, Hong Wang, David C. Williams Jr. and Robert Riehn is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Meet NANOSENSORS at booth 218 at ChinaNano 2019 Beijing August 17 – 19, 2019

We are at booth 218 at the ChinaNano 2019, the 8th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology at the Beijing International Convention Center (BICC). We are looking forward to seeing you there!

Learn all about NANOSENSORS AFM probes at the ChinaNano 2019