Tag Archives: AFMプローブ

Plant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models

Plant-based scaffolds present many advantages over a variety of biomaterials.*

Recent studies explored their potential to be repopulated with human cells and thus highlight a growing interest for their use in tissue engineering or for biomedical applications. However, it is still unclear if these in vitro plant-based scaffolds can modify cell phenotype or affect cellular response to external stimuli.

In the research article “Plant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models “ Jerome Lacombe, Ashlee F. Harris, Ryan Zenhausern, Sophia Karsunsky and Frederic Zenhausern report the characterization of the mechano-regulation of melanoma SK-MEL-28 and prostate PC3 cells seeded on decellularized spinach leaves scaffolds, compared to cells deposited on standard rigid cell culture substrate, as well as their response to drug and radiation treatment.*

In their study the authors show that plant decellularization provide soft scaffolds that match the stiffness range of most of the human tissue and modify cell behavior, including drug and radiation response, compared to standard cell culture models. Because of their distinguished features (natural vasculature, low immunogenicity, low cost, relative ease, etc.) and their wide variations in the shape and structures, these scaffolds offer a multi-controllable model with multiple biochemical and biophysical interactions. However, additional studies are required to determine if they could address important architectural and physical challenges of the in vivo tissue environment.

For force measurement, the Young’s Modulus (YM) of the leaf scaffolds were determined using force spectroscopy mode at liquid interface with NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probes for leaves measurement.*

NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probe top view (SEM image
NANOSENSORS uniqprobe qp-BioAC AFM probe top view (SEM image)

*Jerome Lacombe, Ashlee F. Harris, Ryan Zenhausern, Sophia Karsunsky and Frederic Zenhausern
Plant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models
Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology (2020) 8:932.
DOI: 10.3389/fbioe.2020.00932

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fbioe.2020.00932/full#B27

Open Access: The article “Plant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models” by Jerome Lacombe, Ashlee F. Harris, Ryan Zenhausern, Sophia Karsunsky and Frederic Zenhausern is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure

Electrical manipulation of skyrmions attracts considerable attention for its rich physics and promising applications. To date, such a manipulation is realized mainly via spin-polarized current based on spin-transfer torque or spin–orbital torque effect.*

However, this scheme is energy consuming and may produce massive Joule heating. To reduce energy dissipation and risk of heightened temperatures of skyrmion-based devices, an effective solution is to use electric field instead of current as stimulus.*

In the article “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure”, Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu realize an electric-field manipulation of skyrmions in a nanostructured ferromagnetic/ferroelectrical heterostructure at room temperature via an inverse magneto-mechanical effect.*

Intriguingly, such a manipulation is non-volatile and exhibits a multistate feature. Numerical simulations indicate that the electric-field manipulation of skyrmions originates from strain-mediated modification of effective magnetic anisotropy and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction.*

The results presented in the article open a direction for constructing low-energy-dissipation, non-volatile, and multistate skyrmion-based spintronic devices.*

To minimize the influence of the magnetic field from the MFM tip on the magnetic domain structure during the magnetic force microscopy ( MFM ) measurements, NANOSENSORS™ PPP-LM-MFMR low moment magnetic AFM probes were used.*

These MFM probes are designed for magnetic force microscopy with reduced disturbance of the magnetic sample by the tip and enhanced lateral resolution compared to the standard PPP-MFMR probe. The distance between the tip and sample was maintained at a constant distance of 30 nm.*

Figure 2 from “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang et al.:
Electric-field-induced switching of individual skyrmion.
The transferred average strain εave and corresponding magnetic domain evolution processes in the d ~ 350 nm a [Pt/Co/Ta]12 and b [Pt/Co/Ta]8 nano-dots in a cycle of E ranging from +10 to −10 kV cm−1. Positive εave (red dots) represents tensile strain while negative εave (blue dots) represents compressive strain. μ0H represents the external magnetic field except that from the MFM tip and here μ0H is equal to be 0 mT. The inset of b illustrates the spin texture of the magnetic domain that is encompassed by the red box. The stripe domain enclosed by the black box shows the initial state of the magnetic domain evolution path. The gray dots represent the corresponding electric field for the MFM images. The MFM contrast represents the MFM tip resonant frequency shift (Δf). The scale bar represents 250 nm.

NANOSENSORS™ PPP-LM-MFMR low moment magnetic AFM probes were used
Figure 2 from “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang et al.:
Electric-field-induced switching of individual skyrmion.
The transferred average strain εave and corresponding magnetic domain evolution processes in the d ~ 350 nm a [Pt/Co/Ta]12 and b [Pt/Co/Ta]8 nano-dots in a cycle of E ranging from +10 to −10 kV cm−1. Positive εave (red dots) represents tensile strain while negative εave (blue dots) represents compressive strain. μ0H represents the external magnetic field except that from the MFM tip and here μ0H is equal to be 0 mT. The inset of b illustrates the spin texture of the magnetic domain that is encompassed by the red box. The stripe domain enclosed by the black box shows the initial state of the magnetic domain evolution path. The gray dots represent the corresponding electric field for the MFM images. The MFM contrast represents the MFM tip resonant frequency shift (Δf). The scale bar represents 250 nm.

*Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu
Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure
Nature Communications volume 11, Article no. 3577 (2020)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17354-7

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/b6qpr

Open Access: The article “Electric-field-driven non-volatile multi-state switching of individual skyrmions in a multiferroic heterostructure” by Yadong Wang, Lei Wang, Jing Xia, Zhengxun Lai, Guo Tian, Xichao Zhang, Zhipeng Hou, Xingsen Gao, Wenbo Mi, Chun Feng, Min Zeng, Guofu Zhou, Guanghua Yu, Guangheng Wu, Yan Zhou, Wenhong Wang, Xi-xiang Zhang and Junming Liu is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy

Friction in nanoscale contacts is determined by the size and structure of the interface that is hidden between the contacting bodies. One approach to investigating the origins of friction is to measure electrical conductivity as a proxy for contact size and structure. However, the relationships between contact, friction and conductivity are not fully understood, limiting the usefulness of such measurements for interpreting dynamic sliding properties.*

In their study “Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy” Nicholas Chan, Mohammad R. Vazirisereshk, Ashlie Martini and Philip Egberts used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simultaneously acquire lattice resolution images of the lateral force and current flow through the tip–sample contact formed between a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) sample and a conductive diamond AFM probe to explore the underlying mechanisms and correlations between friction and conductivity. Both current and lateral force exhibited fluctuations corresponding to the periodicity of the HOPG lattice.

Unexpectedly, while lateral force increased during stick events of atomic stick-slip, the current decreased exponentially.*

The results presented in the study by Nicholas Chan et al. confirm that the correlation between conduction and atom–atom distance previously proposed for stationary contacts can be extended to sliding contacts in the stick-slip regime.*

A NANOSENSORS™ conductive diamond coated AFM probe CDT-CONTR was used to obtain all experimental data presented in their manuscript.*

Figure 1 (a) from “Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy” by Nicholas Chan et al:
A schematic of the experimental setup is shown in Fig. 1(a). The experiment was conducted using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) (RHK) AFM at room temperature at a pressure of <1109Torr. A doped diamond coated cantilever (NANOSENSORS CDT-CONTR) with a normal bending spring constant of 0.86 N m1and lateral spring constant of 10 N m1was used to obtain all experimental data presented in this manuscript.

Figure 1 (a) from “Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy” by Nicholas Chan et al:
A schematic of the experimental setup is shown in Fig. 1(a). The experiment was conducted using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV)AFM at room temperature at a pressure of <1109Torr. A doped diamond coated cantilever (NANOSENSORS CDT-CONTR) with a normal bending spring constant of 0.86 N m1and lateral spring constant of 10 N m1was used to obtain all experimental data presented in this manuscript.

*Nicholas Chan, Mohammad R. Vazirisereshk, Ashlie Martini and Philip Egberts
Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy
Nanoscale Advances., 2020, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/d0na00414f

Please follow this external link to read the whole article: https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2020/na/d0na00414f

Open Access: The article “Insights into dynamic sliding contacts from conductive atomic force microscopy” by Nicholas Chan, Mohammad R. Vazirisereshk, Ashlie Martini and Philip Egberts is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.