Tag Archives: nanocomposites

Highly efficient fullerene and non-fullerene based ternary organic solar cells incorporating a new tetrathiocin-cored semiconductor

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on nanocomposites of π-conjugated semiconductors are a prospective solar cell technology and have attracted considerable attention due to unprecedented attributes such as printability, foldability, portability, wearability, semi-transparency and amenability to cost-effective large area fabrication. Extensive and focussed research to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells have led to the development of highly efficient bulk heterojunction (BHJ) single and multijunction organic solar cells with PCEs > 15%.*

In the paper “Highly efficient fullerene and non-fullerene based ternary organic solar cells incorporating a new tetrathiocin-cored semiconductor” Lethy Krishnan Jagadamma, Rupert G. D. Taylor, Alexander L. Kanibolotsky, Muhammad Tariq Sajjad, Iain A. Wright, Peter N. Horton, Simon J. Coles, Ifor D. W. Samuel and Peter J. Skabara present a dual-chain oligothiophene-based organic semiconductor, EH-5T-TTC.*

Detailed characterisation of the ternary blend systems as presented in the paper implies that the ternary small molecule EH-5T-TTC functions differently in polymer: fullerene and polymer: non-fullerene blends and has dual functions of morphology modification and complementary spectral absorption.*

To understand the differences in recombination dynamics of the blends containing EH-5T-TTC and fullerene/non-fullerene acceptors, detailed morphological characterisation was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM).*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-NCSTR silicon AFM probes with typical force constant of 7.4 Nm−1 were used for the AFM height images presented in the paper.

Fig. 7 from “Highly efficient fullerene and non-fullerene based ternary organic solar cells incorporating a new tetrathiocin-cored semiconductor”:
AFM height images of the binary and ternary blends of PTB7-Th:EH-IDTBR and PTB7-Th:PC71BM. (a) Binary PTB7-Th:EH-IDTBR (b) ternary PTB7-Th:EH-IDTBR:EH-5T-TTC (c) binary PTB7-Th:PC71BM and (d) ternary PTB7-Th:PC71BM:EH-5T-TTC.

*Lethy Krishnan Jagadamma, Rupert G. D. Taylor, Alexander L. Kanibolotsky, Muhammad Tariq Sajjad, Iain A. Wright, Peter N. Horton, Simon J. Coles, Ifor D. W. Samuel and Peter J. Skabara
Highly efficient fullerene and non-fullerene based ternary organic solar cells incorporating a new tetrathiocin-cored semiconductor
Sustainable Energy Fuels, 2019, 3, 2087-2099
DOI: 10.1039/C9SE00343F (Paper)

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://pubs.rsc.org/lv/content/articlehtml/2019/se/c9se00343f

Open Access: The article “Highly efficient fullerene and non-fullerene based ternary organic solar cells incorporating a new tetrathiocin-cored semiconductor” by Lethy Krishnan Jagadamma, Rupert G. D. Taylor, Alexander L. Kanibolotsky, Muhammad Tariq Sajjad, Iain A. Wright, Peter N. Horton, Simon J. Coles, Ifor D. W. Samuel and Peter J. Skabara is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds

UV-crosslinkable graphene-reinforced biodegradable nanocomposites using SLA 3D printing technology can potentially remove important cost barriers for personalized biological tissue engineering as compared to the traditional mold-based multistep methods.*

In the research article “Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng et al., the authors present how they developed a UV-curable, 3D-printable and biodegradable resin.*

NANOSENSORS PointProbe®Plus PPP-FMR AFM probes were used to study the morphology of the graphene flakes.*


Figure 4 (e) from «Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng et al.: AFM image of graphene/FLG

* Zuying Feng, Yan Li, Liang Hao, Yihu Yang, Tian Tang, Danna Tang, Wei Xiong
Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds
Journal of Nanomaterials, Volume 2019, Article ID 9710264, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9710264

Please follow this external link to the full research article: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2019/9710264/

Open Access The article “Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng, Yan Li, Liang Hao, Yihu Yang, Tian Tang, Danna Tang, Wei Xiong is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/