Tag Archives: graphene

Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet

Graphene, since its discovery in 2004 has attracted enormous interest due to its physical and chemical properties, and wide applications. *

Graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as an attractive alternative to graphene due to low cost, large scale production and solution processability. GO is prepared by oxidative exfoliation of graphite.*

The work function is a fundamental electronic property of a material and can be used to interpret the relative position of the Fermi level.*

For efficient transport of electrons or holes in a heterojunction device, the work function of the materials plays a crucial role, since work function determines how the bands will align at the contacts.*

Recently there has been an increased interest in applications of GO for interfacial layers and transparent electrode materials in optoelectronic devices e.g. liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), touch screens, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and as supercapacitor electrodes. Tuning the work function of GO is key to achieving high performance devices. *

In the article “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy, the authors demonstrate doping graphene oxide (GO) films using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with subsequent tuning of the work function.*

The surface potential of the plasma functionalized GO films could be tuned by 120 ± 10 mV by varying plasma parameters. *

Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy ( SKPM ) also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy ( KPFM ) measurements were carried out to realize changes in work function of the GO films with plasma functionalization.*

NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-EFM AFM probes with a platinum iridium coating were used to perform surface potential measurements. *

The Kelvin probe studies showed that the bonding configuration can influence the work function of GO. Pyridinic nitrogen transforms GO to p-type while graphitic nitrogen increases the electron density of GO and transforming it to n type. Pointing to the fact that a low power APPJ can effectively tune the work function of GO and hence the conductivity. *

The findings presented in the article are extremely useful in fabricating heterojunction devices like sensors and optoelectronic devices where band structure alignment is key to device performance when GO is used as a charge transport layer. This technique can be extended to other known 2D systems.*

Fig. 10 (a) from “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey et al.:

a) KPFM surface potential map of reference GO thin film ( please have a look at https://pubs.rsc.org/image/article/2020/CP/c9cp06174f/c9cp06174f-f10_hi-res.gif for the full figure.)
Figure 10 (a) from “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey et al.:

a) KPFM surface potential map of reference GO thin film ( please have a look at https://pubs.rsc.org/image/article/2020/CP/c9cp06174f/c9cp06174f-f10_hi-res.gif for the full figure.)

*Avishek Dey, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy
Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 2020, 22, 7685-7698
DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06174F

Please follow this external link for the full article: https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2020/cp/c9cp06174f

Open Access: The article “Engineering work function of graphene oxide from p to n type using a low power atmospheric pressure plasma jet” by Avishek Dey, logoa, Paheli Ghosh, James Bowen, Nicholas St. J. Braithwaite and Satheesh Krishnamurthy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface

Carbon-based layers play an important role in boundary lubrication, from graphite as commercial solid lubricant in a spray can over diamond-like carbon coatings in automotive industries all the way to graphitic layers found in metal-metal hip implants. With increasing availability of graphene, the two-dimensional building block of graphite, its possible role in lubrication is being explored. *

After the discovery of friction and wear reduction on steel surfaces by graphene in a variety of environments, graphene is now emerging as new lubricant. Polymer composites with graphene exhibit improved tribological properties due to wear reduction by efficient transfer layers. The composite approach has been successfully extended to multilayers of polymer and graphene. The use of graphene as additive in formulated lubricant oils is also promising after functionalization to improve solubility. *

In their letter “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” G. Krämer, C. Kim, K-S. Kim and R. Bennewitz report experimental results for fundamental lubrication properties of the interface between a hexadecane model lubricant and a steel surface modified by a single layer graphene. Using high-resolution force microscopy, they quantify that the reduction of friction on graphene is connected to an ordered layer of adsorbed hexadecane molecules and that the graphene induces an ordering in molecular layers in the confined liquid above graphene patches. *

A single layer of graphene on steel surfaces causes a change in the near-surface structure of the model lubricant hexadecane. Hexadecane adsorbs in an ordered layer aligned straight molecules, and this layer is stable under scanning in contact with the tip of an atomic force microscope, while no such layer is observed on the steel substrate. Graphene and hexadecane layer reduce friction at the nanoscale by a factor of three compared to the bare steel in hexadecane. *

All AFM measurements described in this letter were performed using a NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-CONTR AFM probe at room temperature with a home-built fluid cell where the cantilever was fully immersed in hexadecane.*

 Figure 3 from “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer et al.:
 High-resolution lateral force maps recorded in hexadecane with a normal force of 3 nN. (a) On graphene, the adsorbed hexadecane molecules arrange in form of lamellae with a width of 2.1 nm. The cross-section was taken along the line indicated. The schematic depiction of the orientation of one hexadecane molecule is informed by the results in [21]. (b) On the steel substrate, an irregular stick-slip pattern with a characteristic slip length of about 1 nm is observed. The two cross-sections are taken the along the lines indicated in the respective color.
Figure 3 from “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer et al.:
High-resolution lateral force maps recorded in hexadecane with a normal force of 3 nN. (a) On graphene, the adsorbed hexadecane molecules arrange in form of lamellae with a width of 2.1 nm. The cross-section was taken along the line indicated. The schematic depiction of the orientation of one hexadecane molecule is informed by the results in [21]. (b) On the steel substrate, an irregular stick-slip pattern with a characteristic slip length of about 1 nm is observed. The two cross-sections are taken the along the lines indicated in the respective color.

*G. Krämer, C. Kim, K-S. Kim and R. Bennewitz
Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface
Nanotechnology, Volume 30, Number 46, 2019, 46LT01
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/ab3cab

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6528/ab3cab

Open Access: The letter “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer, C Kim, K-S Kim and R Bennewitz is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds

UV-crosslinkable graphene-reinforced biodegradable nanocomposites using SLA 3D printing technology can potentially remove important cost barriers for personalized biological tissue engineering as compared to the traditional mold-based multistep methods.*

In the research article “Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng et al., the authors present how they developed a UV-curable, 3D-printable and biodegradable resin.*

NANOSENSORS PointProbe®Plus PPP-FMR AFM probes were used to study the morphology of the graphene flakes.*


Figure 4 (e) from «Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng et al.: AFM image of graphene/FLG

* Zuying Feng, Yan Li, Liang Hao, Yihu Yang, Tian Tang, Danna Tang, Wei Xiong
Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds
Journal of Nanomaterials, Volume 2019, Article ID 9710264, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/9710264

Please follow this external link to the full research article: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2019/9710264/

Open Access The article “Graphene-Reinforced Biodegradable Resin Composites for Stereolithographic 3D Printing of Bone Structure Scaffolds” by Zuying Feng, Yan Li, Liang Hao, Yihu Yang, Tian Tang, Danna Tang, Wei Xiong is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/