Tag Archives: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials

NANOSENSORS™ conductive diamond coated  CDT-NCLR AFM probes were used for the piezoresponse force microscopy ( PFM ) on non-piezoelectric dielectrics described in this brand new publication: “Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials” by Amir Abdollahi et al.

The autors show theoretically and experimentally, that large effective piezoelectric coefficients can be measured in non-piezoelectric dielectrics due to converse flexoelectricity.*

Figure 4 from “Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials” by Amir Abdollahi et al.: Study of converse flexoelectricity induced at the tip apex of an atomic force microscope cantilever as a function of the applied force. a Effective piezoelectric coefficient as a function of applied force for the SrTiO3 crystal. Filled squares correspond to the values obtained after the simulation. Empty circles correspond to the experimental values obtained with a NANOSENSORS CDT-FM AFM tip with a cantilever of medium stiffness (k ≈ 2.8 Nm−1) coated with doped diamond. The error bars correspond to the error of the linear fitting of the experimental data, which correlates the measured electromechanical amplitude of oscillation Δh with the Vac applied voltage. b The effective contact radius a scales with the force, and is determined by the tip radius. The experimental tip radius is obtained after the measurement of the nanoscale electromechanical response from the scanning electron microscopy image of the used tip. In this case, the tip radius of the diamond coated tip is 105 nm, and is observed to keep a spherical shape after the measurements
Figure 4 from “Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials” by Amir Abdollahi et al.:
Study of converse flexoelectricity induced at the tip apex of an atomic force microscope cantilever as a function of the applied force. a Effective piezoelectric coefficient as a function of applied force for the SrTiO3 crystal. Filled squares correspond to the values obtained after the simulation. Empty circles correspond to the experimental values obtained with a Nanosensors CDT-FMR tip with a cantilever of medium stiffness (k ≈ 2.8 Nm−1) coated with doped diamond. The error bars correspond to the error of the linear fitting of the experimental data, which correlates the measured electromechanical amplitude of oscillation Δh with the Vac applied voltage. b The effective contact radius a scales with the force, and is determined by the tip radius. The experimental tip radius is obtained after the measurement of the nanoscale electromechanical response from the scanning electron microscopy image of the used tip. In this case, the tip radius of the diamond coated tip is 105 nm, and is observed to keep a spherical shape after the measurements

*Amir Abdollahi, Neus Domingo, Irene Arias, Gustau Catalan
Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials
Nature Communicationsvolume 10, Article number: 1266 (2019)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09266-y

Please refer to this external link for the full article: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-09266-y

Open Access The article «Converse flexoelectricity yields large piezoresponse force microscopy signals in non-piezoelectric materials» by Amir Abdollahi et al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

 

Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures

“In the ferroelectric devices, polarization control is usually accomplished by application of an electric field.”* In the article “Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures” Tao Li et al. demonstrate optically induced polarization switching in BaTiO3-based ferroelectric heterostructures utilizing a two-dimensional narrow-gap semiconductor MoS2 as a top electrode.

NANOSENSORS PPP-EFM PtIr coated AFM probes were used to perform the KPFM and PFM measurements mentioned in the article cited below.

Figure 1 from “Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures”: Electrically induced polarization switching in the MoS2/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 junction. a, b PFM phase (a) and amplitude (b) images after application of a negative voltage pulse (−5 V, 0.5 s) to the MoS2 flake. The 12-u.c.-thick BTO film underneath the MoS2 flake is fully switched to the upward polarization, Pup. c, d PFM phase (c) and amplitude (d) images after application of several positive voltage pulses (+5 V, 0.5 s) to the MoS2 flake. BTO underneath the MoS2 flake is fully switched to downward polarization, Pdown. The polarization state of the bare BTO film (at the lower right corner) is not affected by the electrical bias. e, f The I–V characteristics of the same junction measured in the dark and during illumination. The tunneling current for the OFF state (Pup) is largely increased under illumination. Silicon AFM probes with Pt/Ir conductive coating and nominal stiffness of 3 N m−1 (PPP-EFM, NANOSENSORS) were used to perform the KPFM and PFM measurements.
Figure 1 from “Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures”:
Electrically induced polarization switching in the MoS2/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 junction. a, b PFM phase (a) and amplitude (b) images after application of a negative voltage pulse (−5 V, 0.5 s) to the MoS2 flake. The 12-u.c.-thick BTO film underneath the MoS2 flake is fully switched to the upward polarization, Pup. c, d PFM phase (c) and amplitude (d) images after application of several positive voltage pulses (+5 V, 0.5 s) to the MoS2 flake. BTO underneath the MoS2 flake is fully switched to downward polarization, Pdown. The polarization state of the bare BTO film (at the lower right corner) is not affected by the electrical bias. e, f The I–V characteristics of the same junction measured in the dark and during illumination. The tunneling current for the OFF state (Pup) is largely increased under illumination

*Tao Li, Alexey Lipatov, Haidong Lu, Hyungwoo Lee, Jung-Woo Lee, Engin Torun, Ludger Wirtz, Chang-Beom Eom, Jorge Íñiguez, Alexander Sinitskii, Alexei Gruverman
Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures
Nature Communications, volume 9, Article number: 3344 (2018)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-05640-4

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/bdFYw

Open Access:  The article “Optical control of polarization in ferroelectric heterostructures” by Tao Li et. Al. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films

A NANOSENSORS AdvancedTEC ATEC-EFM PtIr coated AFM probe was used for the piezo force microscopy (PFM) characterization in this interesting paper by Borderon et.al Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films published in Nature Communications.

Figure 1 from Borderon et al. Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films: Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM) characterization of the epitaxial PZT thin films. The scan size is 2 μm×1 μm for the c-domain ample and 1 μm × 0.5 μm for the a/c-domain sample. PFM characterization done with ATEC-EFM AFM probe
Figure 1 from Borderon et.al Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films: Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM) characterization of the epitaxial PZT thin films. The scan size is 2 μm×1
μm for the c-domain ample and 1 μm × 0.5 μm for the a/c-domain sample.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. Borderon, A. E. Brunier, K. Nadaud, R. Renoud, M. Alexe, H. W. Gundel
Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films
Nature Scientific Reports, volume 7, Article number: 3444 (2017)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-03757-y

To read the full article please follow this external link: https://rdcu.be/5qTo

Open Access:  The article  Domain wall motion in Pb(Zr0.20Ti0.80)O3 epitaxial thin films  by Borderon et.al is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing,  adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/