Tag Archives: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

Infrared nano-spectroscopy of ferroelastic domain walls in hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7

Ferroic materials are well known to exhibit heterogeneity in the form of domain walls. Understanding the properties of these boundaries is crucial for controlling functionality with external stimuli and for realizing their potential for ultra-low power memory and logic devices as well as novel computing architectures.*

In the article “Infrared nano-spectroscopy of ferroelastic domain walls in hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7” K. A. Smith, E. A. Nowadnick, S. Fan, O. Khatib, S. J. Lim, B. Gao, N. C. Harms, S. N. Neal, J. K. Kirkland, M. C. Martin, C. J. Won, M. B. Raschke, S.-W. Cheong, C. J. Fennie, G. L. Carr, H. A. Bechtel and J. L. Musfeldt employ synchrotron-based near-field infrared nano-spectroscopy to reveal the vibrational properties of ferroelastic (90∘ ferroelectric) domain walls in the hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7 . By locally mapping the Ti-O stretching and Ti-O-Ti bending modes, they reveal how structural order parameters rotate across a wall. Thus, they link observed near-field amplitude changes to underlying structural modulations and test ferroelectric switching models against real space measurements of local structure. This initiative opens the door to broadband infrared nano-imaging of heterogeneity in ferroics.*

NANOSENSORS™ Platinum Silicide PtSi-NCH AFM probes were used for the Near-field infrared spectroscopy. Atomic force and piezoforce imaging reveal the different orientations of directional order parameters and domain wall character, providing a physical playground for graph theory. *

Fig. 2 from: «Infrared nano-spectroscopy of ferroelastic domain walls in hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7» K. A. Smith et al. 2019
Combining scanning techniques to locate domain walls. a, b Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images of the crystal surfaces showing the two ferroelastic domain walls of interest (at the edges of the dark blue stripes). These ferroelastic walls separate domains of different spontaneous strain and are also 90∘ ferroelectric walls. DW 1 and DW 2 refer to domain walls 1 and 2. Red arrows indicate direction and path of the line scans. The nano-spectroscopic line scans are taken perpendicular to the wall, and the contact angle from one domain to another is 90∘. c AFM topography of a smooth area near an identified surface defect (indicated by a green circle) and step edge of approximately 100 nm height (indicated with a red arrow) compared with d the piezoresponse force microscopic (PFM) image of the same area revealing the placement and orientation of the 180∘ ferroelectric domains, indicated by yellow(+) or blue(−) regions with black or white arrows to indicate the polarization direction. All of these structures are present at room temperature

*K. A. Smith, E. A. Nowadnick, S. Fan, O. Khatib, S. J. Lim, B. Gao, N. C. Harms, S. N. Neal, J. K. Kirkland, M. C. Martin, C. J. Won, M. B. Raschke, S.-W. Cheong, C. J. Fennie, G. L. Carr, H. A. Bechtel and J. L. Musfeldt
Infrared nano-spectroscopy of ferroelastic domain walls in hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7
Nature Communications volume 10, Article number: 5235 (2019)
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13066-9

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://rdcu.be/b2rPq

Open Access: The article “Infrared nano-spectroscopy of ferroelastic domain walls in hybrid improper ferroelectric Ca3Ti2O7” by K. A. Smith, E. A. Nowadnick, S. Fan, O. Khatib, S. J. Lim, B. Gao, N. C. Harms, S. N. Neal, J. K. Kirkland, M. C. Martin, C. J. Won, M. B. Raschke, S.-W. Cheong, C. J. Fennie, G. L. Carr, H. A. Bechtel and J. L. Musfeldt is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

NANOSENSORS proudly sponsors Asia-Pacific PFM 2019 workshop

NANOSENSORS™ is a proud sponsor of the 2019 Asia-Pacific Workshop on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy ( PFM) and Nanoscale Electromechanics of Functional Materials and Electrochemical Systems (Asia-Pacific PFM 2019), which will be held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, from August 11 to 14, 2019.

We wish all those members of the #AFMcommunity who are participating this week a successful workshop.

In the NANOSENSORS blog you will regularly find references to articles mentioning the use of our AFM probes for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy. You’re welcome to have a look at: https://www.nanosensors.com/blog/tag/pfm/

NANOSENSORS conductive and wear-resistant Platinum-Silicide AFM probes – the best of both worlds

Ferroelectricity-free lead halide perovskites

In the recent publication “Ferroelectricity-free lead halide perovskites” Andrés Gómez, Qiong Wang, Alejandro R. Goñi, Mariano Campoy-Quilesa and Antonio Abate describe how they employed direct piezoelectric force microscopy ( DPFM ) to examine whether or not lead halide perovskites exhibit ferroelectricity.*

Their article aims to provide a deeper understanding of the fundamental physical properties of the organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites and solves a longstanding dispute about their non-ferroelectric character: an issue of high relevance for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.*

In the course of their research in which besides using DPFM, they also employed piezoelectric force microscopy ( PFM ) and electrostatic force microscopy ( EFM ), they could demonstrate the non-ferroelectricity of lead halide perovskites. *

The PFM images were acquired using a PtIr coated NANOSENSORS PPP-EFM AFM probe.

Fig. 5 from “Ferroelectricity-free lead halide perovskites” by Andrés Gómez et al.: Scheme of the three AFM modes DPFM (a), EFM (b) and PFM (c) with the measurement results of the MAPbI3 perovskite at a film thickness of 152 nm ((i): scanning from left to right, and (ii): scanning from right to left for DPFM measurements; and (iii) and (iv) for EFM and PFM measurements, respectively), 218 nm ((v): scanning from left to right, and (vi): scanning from right to left for DPFM measurements; and (vii) and (viii) for EFM and PFM measurements, respectively), and 400 nm ((ix): scanning from left to right, and (x): scanning from right to left for DPFM measurements; and (xi) and (xii) for EFM and PFM measurements, respectively). Insets given in (iii), (vii), and (xi) are the topography channel of EFM images of the samples.

*Andrés Gómez, Qiong Wang, Alejandro R. Goñi, Mariano Campoy-Quilesa, Antonio Abate
Ferroelectricity-free lead halide perovskites
Energy Environ. Sci., 2019, Advance Article
doi: 10.1039/C9EE00884E

Please follow this external link to the full article: https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2019/ee/c9ee00884e#!divAbstract

Open Access: The article “Ferroelectricity-free lead halide perovskites” by Andrés Gómez, Qiong Wang, Alejandro R. Goñi, Mariano Campoy-Quilesa and Antonio Abate is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/