Tag Archives: force microscopy

Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface

Carbon-based layers play an important role in boundary lubrication, from graphite as commercial solid lubricant in a spray can over diamond-like carbon coatings in automotive industries all the way to graphitic layers found in metal-metal hip implants. With increasing availability of graphene, the two-dimensional building block of graphite, its possible role in lubrication is being explored. *

After the discovery of friction and wear reduction on steel surfaces by graphene in a variety of environments, graphene is now emerging as new lubricant. Polymer composites with graphene exhibit improved tribological properties due to wear reduction by efficient transfer layers. The composite approach has been successfully extended to multilayers of polymer and graphene. The use of graphene as additive in formulated lubricant oils is also promising after functionalization to improve solubility. *

In their letter “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” G. Krämer, C. Kim, K-S. Kim and R. Bennewitz report experimental results for fundamental lubrication properties of the interface between a hexadecane model lubricant and a steel surface modified by a single layer graphene. Using high-resolution force microscopy, they quantify that the reduction of friction on graphene is connected to an ordered layer of adsorbed hexadecane molecules and that the graphene induces an ordering in molecular layers in the confined liquid above graphene patches. *

A single layer of graphene on steel surfaces causes a change in the near-surface structure of the model lubricant hexadecane. Hexadecane adsorbs in an ordered layer aligned straight molecules, and this layer is stable under scanning in contact with the tip of an atomic force microscope, while no such layer is observed on the steel substrate. Graphene and hexadecane layer reduce friction at the nanoscale by a factor of three compared to the bare steel in hexadecane. *

All AFM measurements described in this letter were performed using a NANOSENSORS™ PointProbe® Plus PPP-CONTR AFM probe at room temperature with a home-built fluid cell where the cantilever was fully immersed in hexadecane.*

 Figure 3 from “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer et al.:
 High-resolution lateral force maps recorded in hexadecane with a normal force of 3 nN. (a) On graphene, the adsorbed hexadecane molecules arrange in form of lamellae with a width of 2.1 nm. The cross-section was taken along the line indicated. The schematic depiction of the orientation of one hexadecane molecule is informed by the results in [21]. (b) On the steel substrate, an irregular stick-slip pattern with a characteristic slip length of about 1 nm is observed. The two cross-sections are taken the along the lines indicated in the respective color.
Figure 3 from “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer et al.:
High-resolution lateral force maps recorded in hexadecane with a normal force of 3 nN. (a) On graphene, the adsorbed hexadecane molecules arrange in form of lamellae with a width of 2.1 nm. The cross-section was taken along the line indicated. The schematic depiction of the orientation of one hexadecane molecule is informed by the results in [21]. (b) On the steel substrate, an irregular stick-slip pattern with a characteristic slip length of about 1 nm is observed. The two cross-sections are taken the along the lines indicated in the respective color.

*G. Krämer, C. Kim, K-S. Kim and R. Bennewitz
Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface
Nanotechnology, Volume 30, Number 46, 2019, 46LT01
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/ab3cab

Please follow this external link to read the full article: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6528/ab3cab

Open Access: The letter “Single layer graphene induces load-bearing molecular layering at the hexadecane-steel interface” by G Krämer, C Kim, K-S Kim and R Bennewitz is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

NANOSENSORS PPP-NCHAu and PPP-FMAu AFM tips were used in the research for this interesting paper

Derek Novak et al.
Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy
Science Advances 
25 Mar 2016
Vol. 2, no. 3, e1501571
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501571
This work is licensed under CC BY-NC (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0)

Abstract
Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials.

Please follow this external link for the full article http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/3/e1501571.full

Core-shell star block copolymers with hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) cores and hydrophilic polymethaacrylate arms (shell section) attached to the PS core
Core-shell star block copolymers with hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) cores and hydrophilic polymethaacrylate arms (shell section) attached to the PS core. Images courtesy of Molecular Vista. A NANOSENSORS PPP-NCHAu AFM tip was used for this application. These images are not part of the above mentioned article but a further illustration of the possiblities.